Monthly Archives: July 2020

GWEN WARREN PRESENTS THE JULY BANT WEBINAR 2020

30 Ways to get 1:1 Clients WITHOUT using Social Media

This webinar explores a large range of options for getting your nutrition business known in your area of expertise, WITHOUT using social media.

It covers:

  • Business foundations – knowing your market, what you are offering, your competitors
  • Building your product, visibility and content
  • 30+ creative ways of promoting your business
  • Some homework of practical action
  • How to be part of the live August BANT workshop run by Gwen

Click here to access the full eblast.

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Plant Compounds for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

This clinical trial showed that FERULIC ACID, an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compound found in many plant foods, can improve several CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS within just six weeks in people with elevated blood lipids.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here https://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/29865227?term=29865227

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the database homepage to subscribe for the next alert.

 

BANT Supports the ‘Better Health’ Campaign but Cautions Against the ‘One-Size-Fits-All’ Approach

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) whole-heartedly supports any Governmental focus on improving the health of the British nation, a goal that BANT has, itself, been campaigning for over the past 20 years.

The ‘Better Health’ campaign with its U-turn on policy relating to junk food advertising and its goals to restrict BOGOF (Buy One, Get One Free) deals relating to foods that are ultra-processed, high in salt, fat and sugar and their availability at check-outs, is the first step in the right direction. It will set the background for establishing the changes needed to engender a long-term cultural shift which allows healthy behaviour adaptations to an environment that offers so many opportunities for unhealthy indulgence either knowingly or in ignorance.

BANT is, however, against the use of calorie counting as it is well established that calorie counting is difficult to manage in supporting people looking to lower their risk of obesity. Calorie counting takes little to no account of the nutritional values of different foods and their relation to health and is problematic for those at risk of eating disorders. Not for the first time BANT is asking “why promote a campaign that leads the population to rely on calorie defined processed foods, rather than simple, wholesome ingredients?”. BANT is looking forward to the outcome of work done on traffic light labelling system. The current system has some shortcomings, for example, in that a red label can be assigned to a healthy food e.g. an avocado, making it confusing to the public.

The causes of obesity are multifactorial and can include increased stress levels, systemic low-grade inflammation, lack of exercise, and choice of foods and their preparation/cooking methods, amongst others. There is growing evidence that minimally processed foods like non-starchy vegetables, fruit and healthy protein are more satiating and elicit less of a glycaemic response than ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets. Additionally, minimally processed foods are associated with a decreased risk of cardio-metabolic disease. BANT published an article ‘Nutrition in the Age of Convenience’ in 2019 highlighting how the prevalence of highly addictive ultra-processed foods and drinks have massively impacted the nation’s health. (A fully referenced, academic paper on this topic is available on request).

BANT continuously cautions that population-wide recommendations highlighted in Eatwell Guide that is not only based on out-dated nutrition science but is also aimed at a ‘healthy population’ is inappropriate. It is not only putting the health of the British public at risk but is contributing to the current National Health Service crisis. The OECD 2019 obesity rankings classified the UK as the eleventh most obese nation in the world, which whilst an improvement is still a truly dubious honour. Obesity and its related conditions are complex issues which require interventions at multiple levels to achieve both effective prevention and successful treatment, and this is putting an unbearable and unwarranted burden on NHS. A burden that the NHS at this time can ill-afford.

BANT was launched in 1997 to meet the needs of practitioners who were looking to practice a different approach to nutrition, one that was based on personalising evidence-based recommendations to the individual. BANT has, since its foundation, continuously called out for a different approach to the obesity crisis and has suggested: education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term; and promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and of foods and ingredients that are not ultra-processed.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times, and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the obesity targets and health of the individuals.

  • Ends –

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

[email protected]        Tel: +44 870 606 1284

 

NOTES TO EDITORS:

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) is the professional body for Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners. Its primary function is to assist its members in attaining the highest standards of integrity, knowledge, competence and professional practice, in order to protect the client’s interests; nutritional therapy and the registered nutrition practitioner.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here:

 

 

COVID-19 BANT Bulletin 8 – 23 July 2020

Whilst things are appearing to be returning to near normality with our members now being able to return to face-to-face practice in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, please do remember that the Government and CNHC guidelines still need to be adhered to and there may be some differences in practice in different countries and areas if localised measures are in place.

This is our new reality and we need to encourage and support also our clients to comply with guidance that limits the risks of spreading the infection.

Click here to read the full eblast.

BANT IS LOOKING FOR A NEW COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER!

After 4 years in the role as Communications Manager, Jessica Fonteneau has decided it is time to move on to focus her attentions on her MSC and growing NT practice. Jessica has done a sterling job over the past 4 years in establishing the Comms Manager role and keeping our members and the public informed about all the amazing work happening within BANT and the profession. Jessica will be missed, although will remain with us over the coming months to ensure there is a smooth transition over to the person stepping into her shoes ……

The role

The Communications Manager will manage BANT’s internal and external communications needs as per BANT’s communication strategy and timetable for a variety of publications. Write articles and manage social media channels and BANT marketing activities. Collaborate with BANT internal stakeholders, including BANT directors and managers, to understand overall communication needs. Participate as an active member BANT operational management team. Supervise volunteers within the communications team.

What you need

You will need to work from your own home unsupervised and be self-motivated. Attention to detail is paramount within this role.

You will have a bachelor’s degree in communications or a related field. You will use your exceptional written and verbal communications skills to communicate to individuals or to populations. You should have a minimum of 3 years communications experience either within a company or a PR agency and have the ability to design and write articles and marketing materials for print or web-based publications.

Social media is incredibly important to this role and your understanding of social media channels and opportunities and ability to coordinate active campaigns will help you succeed in this role. A keen interest and understanding of the nutrition profession is an advantage. You need to be a skilled team player, excellent at problem-solving and adept at time management.

To succeed in this role, it is essential that you have flawless communication skills to deliver reliable support to stakeholders and an ability to motivate and lead a team of volunteers.

What are the benefits

You will receive a competitive salary, flexible hours and 17 days holiday per annum (plus 8 UK bank holidays). You will form part of a motivated team that are hardworking and ambitious.

Full details of the role and person specification can be found here

If you are interested in applying for this position please send a supporting statement and CV to Melanie de Grooth at [email protected].

Closing date for applications is Sunday 9th August 2020.

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Probiotics for Childhood Gastroenteritis

This meta-analysis showed that a specific PROBIOTIC strain, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM17938, can shorten duration of illness and hospitalisation for acute GASTROENTERITIS in young children.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

BANT PODCAST PROGRAMME 2020 – SERIES 2 – FUNCTIONAL SPORTS NUTRITION

During Series 2 we shall be taking a deep dive into functional sports nutrition. We take a look at sports nutrition from different angles:

  • Endurance
  • Bodybuilding
  • Team Sports Nutrition
  • Functional Considerations

Each guest discusses how to apply nutritional therapy principles to sports nutrition, working with health parameters, the athlete in question, test considerations, protocols and supplements.

This series is created exclusively for BANT members wanting to expand their knowledge of sports nutrition.  Each episode has been awarded 1 hour of CPD.

Click here to read the full eblast.

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Anthocyanins to Reduce Inflammation

This systematic review and meta-analysis found that ANTHOCYANINS, the colourful pigments in plant foods, may reduce INFLAMMATORY MARKERS, with higher doses being more effective.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

 

COVID-19 BANT BULLETIN 7 – 6 JULY 2020

Cautious Return to Face-to-Face Practice

We continue to live in uncertain times but equally we are now ready to proceed to face-to-face consultations as long as we have full infection controls in place.

Along with many professions and practitioners returning to work this week, we are all proceeding with caution as to not contribute to any peaks in infection count and also being all too aware that asymptomatic people can also pass on the virus. To this effect BANT recommends that practitioners embrace remote working practices where possible and if you do start face-to-face appointments, practitioners must comply with CNHC guidelines. You can access all BANT COVID-19 communications here.

The Government has eased the recommended social distancing rule to ‘1 metre plus with masks’ where 2 metres is not possible and CNHC has already previously published a comprehensive guidance on return to face-to-face practice including:

  • Identifying any clients who are at increased risk of infection
  • Screening for COVID-19 symptoms
  • Clarifying when not to proceed to face-to-face appointment
  • How to prepare your practice for face-to-face appointments

Click here to read the full eblast.