Monthly Archives: October 2019

Nutrition Evidence Database – Glutamine May Help Reduce Severe Side Symptoms of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

GLUTAMINE, a simple dietary supplement, may help reduce severe side effects in those undergoing radio- and chemotherapy for non-small cell LUNG CANCER.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here https://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/30813149?term=30813149

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Low-Fat Diet Associated with Lower Rate of Death from or after Breast Cancer

Low fat – High fat? The controversy goes on.  The long-term follow-up of a large clinical trial finds that a LOW-FAT DIET is associated with a lower rate of death from or after BREAST CANCER.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

People Under-Going Genetic Testing to be Accompanied by Trained Professionals

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) supports the call  by Southampton University, Exeter University and Southampton Hospital (published in the BMJ https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l5688) for individuals choosing to undertake genetic testing to be accompanied by trained health professionals.

Personalised healthcare is at the beginning of a genetic revolution with the decoding of the wealth of information that lives within us. Nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and epigenetics are emerging sciences that are already having an enormous impact on all our lives and have a fundamental effect on the way BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners manage their client’s health. Genetic testing can be used to optimise health rather than identifying disease risk.

The University of Southampton publication highlights important shortcomings with Direct-to-Consumer testing and misinterpretation of results with potentially devastating effects and distress. Completing the test with appropriately trained health professional will help to put the results in context.

In 2014 BANT launched its Register of Nutrigenetic Counsellors, following a commitment to the Human Genetics Commission to set up an advanced practice register covering nutrigenetic counselling, following the HGC’s ‘Genes Direct’ reports in 2003 and 2007.

Nutritional therapy and nutrigenomics are linked and BANT Nutrition Practitioners are finding themselves at the cutting edge of scientific knowledge and its application in practice. Genetics and nutrigenomics can be very sensitive subjects and it is vitally important that nutrition practitioners understand the whole picture, what test they should be recommending, how this translates to gene expression and how to explain it to their clients appropriately, safely and legally. Dietary and lifestyle interventions will have more impact on wellbeing than focusing on any gene in isolation. Nature vs. nurture debate continues but, in the meantime, genetic testing can help to optimise the nurture to inform personalised dietary and lifestyle recommendations for optimal wellbeing.

BANT registered nutrition practitioners take into account individuality that enables personalisation of dietary advice based on the most up-to-date research available. They do not suggest ‘one-size-fits-all’ advice following the health trend of the moment. To find a BANT registered nutrition practitioner click here: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces

Nutrition Evidence Database – Gluten-Free Diets can Help Reduce Markers in Those with Metabolic Syndrome

Are GLUTEN-FREE diets, for patients without diagnosed gluten-sensitivity, just a fad? A recent trial finds that a gluten-free diet can help reduce waist circumference, blood glucose and triglyceride levels in those with METABOLIC SYNDROME in just 8 weeks.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here https://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/30362336?term=30362336

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – QUALITY of Diet and not the TYPE Diet is Important for Health

Are you confused about what type of diet to follow?  Vegan?  Vegetarian?  Paleo? A new study has found that it is the QUALITY of your diet and not the TYPE of diet that is important to good health across a range of markers.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.

Read it here https://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/31242604?term=31242604

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database Alert – Research Highlights – September 2019 – Preview

NUTRITION EVIDENCE ALERT

SENT IN COLLABORATION WITH NUTRIENTS 

Nutrients MDPI

For this edition of the Nutrition Evidence Alert, we bring you some of the latest science that has hit peer-reviewed journals in the last few weeks. With so much going on in the field of nutrition at the moment, it is tricky to keep on top of new findings, theories and developments. Our pick of articles this month helps you do just that, so you can stay current and use the information to make effective clinical decisions. The selected articles cover topics from the effects of supplemental bacteriophage on gut inflammation to the association between skipping breakfast and being overweight in childhood. Be sure to check out Ben Brown’s article on the complexity of IBS as well as his paper with Deanna Minich on nutritional strategies that influence glutathione status. There are now 81 articles with plain language summaries on the database from 2019 alone.  Have a browse and remember that focused reading of the science and reflection on the learning outcomes that arise from that learning can be logged as CPD.

As an update, there has been a lot of development under the hood in Nutrition Evidence, including the ability to add a range of different record types. Whilst PubMed will continue to be the main source of articles, you will now notice that when you run a search on ‘gut health’ – for example – you will also find some podcasts and e-Learning modules appearing in your search results. We all learn in different ways, so having the ability to access videos or podcasts from credible sources that complement peer reviewed information varies the ways you can keep abreast of the science through Nutrition Evidence.  This new functionality is in its infancy, so watch it grow as we add more content over the coming months. We will of course, continue to focus on the best research quality available, so you can be assured that you are receiving the very best in nutrition evidence.

Happy exploring.

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, Editor-in-Chief 


Featured 2019 Articles

The following 7 articles are featured as “recommended reading” this month: