Monthly Archives: July 2019

Nutrition Evidence Database – Mushroom Based Extract Has Beneficial Effects on Immune System of Bone Marrow Cancer Patients

A new randomised double blind controlled trial shows that a MUSHROOM-BASED EXTRACT has beneficial effects on the immune system in patients with bone marrow cancer.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/25664323?term=25664323

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

TRAINING CLINIC TUTOR (MULTIPLE VACANCIES)

Institute for Optimum Nutrition

Richmond, London

Competitive day rate

Self-employed contract

The Institute for Optimum Nutrition (ION) is one of the UK’s longest established, and most respected higher education institution and thought leader in nutritional therapy and lifestyle sciences.  This is an exciting time at the Institute as we look to grow and develop new programmes and awards and you’ll have the opportunity to join a fun, hard-working, experienced and nurturing team, and get involved with activities and developmental projects across the organisation.

At ION we aim to create a stimulating, challenging and rewarding learning experience, through sharing a unique fusion of education, research and professional practice and inspiring our students and staff to enrich our communities. Our skilled and creative workforce is comprised of individuals drawn from a broad cross section of the globe, and who reflect a variety of backgrounds, talents, perspectives and experiences to build our global learning community.

We are seeking to appoint multiple Training Clinic to facilitate the learning and training of ION students on the Nutritional Therapy Diploma Course through teaching, assessment, feedback and support by leading a student training clinic group.  This exciting and varied role is at the heart of our students’ clinical practice training to becoming a confident, qualified and registered nutritional therapist.

Who we’re looking for:

  • You will be an experienced practitioner and be able to apply subject knowledge to practice
  • Good communication and interpersonal skills will come naturally to you
  • You will enjoy working in a team but also be able to show that when required you can work independently
  • Participate in focus/reflective groups for tutors
  • Maintain professional registration as a registered Nutritional Therapist
  • Engage in ongoing development of professional skills
  • Attend training events held by ION
  • Comply with ION’s institutional and educational policies.

Click this link for more detailed information – https://www.ion.ac.uk/training-clinic-tutor-multiple-vacancies

To apply please submit a CV and covering letter to [email protected]

Nutrition Evidence Database Alert – Low Carbohydrate Diets – What the Evidence Says

YOUR NUTRITION EVIDENCE ALERT SENT IN COLLABORATION WITH NUTRIENTS

The low-carb diet debate continues and remains controversial in nutrition and medical circles. However, the scientific evidence base is building in relation to the therapeutic potential of low-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets for a number of chronic conditions seen by nutrition practitioners in their clinics. As always, there are studies that sit on the other side of the coin – arguing, once more, for the importance of individualised nutrition protocols.

For this edition of the Nutrition Evidence Alert, we have focused on the evidence base for low-carbohydrate diets, highlighting 38 full text papers that illustrate the impact of reduced carbohydrate intake on obesity, heart disease, Type 2 Diabetes and more. For this alert, I recommend you go through the 15 are randomised controlled trials that the Editorial Team has chosen for you. They all feature a plain language summary, so they’re instantly shareable with patients/clients, friends and family.

Happy reading.

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, Editor-in-Chief

 

 

 

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Miguel Toribio-Mateas shares his editorial picks for this month’s Nutrition Evidence Alert. 

A nutrition practitioner with extensive clinical and research experience, Miguel is a research fellow in brain-gut-microbiota axis and mental health at the School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, where he is working on the design and implementation of clinical trials assessing the effects of fermented foods on mental wellbeing. He tells us that “based on current evidence, no study looking at the impact of carbohydrate-rich foods on health outcomes should ignore the role of the gut microbiota in this process.” 

Miguel tells us how practitioners should look at the best available evidence about low carb diets and critically appraise it, applying it in clinical practice on an case-by-case basis. He also tells us that nutrition researchers should be combining validated patient-reported outcomes measures or PROMs (such as MYMOP) with biological markers such as blood glucose levels or gut microbial profiles as a means to enrich the quality and relevance of the data obtained from clinical interventions, particularly when they take place in the real world. The perfect example are recommendations given to clients / patients at personalised nutrition practices where clinicians provide individualised support based on the person’s needs.

Miguel’s doctoral research focuses on capturing insights from this type of real-world data. His project was awarded a Work-Based Learning Santander Bank scholarship in 2016 and is the first to run at the newly formed Faculty of Transdisciplinary Practice at Middlesex University. He is currently working with a team of health data scientists, and health research technologists building an online system that will enable to capture publication-ready clinical data. The system will be made available to all BANT members from September and will contribute to building practice-based scientific evidence. If you’re a member of BANT, please keep an eye on all communication channels.

These are Miguel’s editorial picks on low-carbohydrate diets and their impact on chronic disease:

> Does high-carbohydrate intake lead to increased risk of obesity? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Individualized Meal Replacement Therapy Improves Clinically Relevant Long-Term Glycemic Control in Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

A Plant-Based High-Carbohydrate, Low-Fat Diet in Overweight Individuals in a 16-Week Randomized Clinical Trial: The Role of Carbohydrates.

Comparison of two low-fat diets, differing in protein and carbohydrate, on psychological wellbeing in adults with obesity and type 2 diabetes: a randomised clinical trial.

Low-carbohydrate diets for type 1 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Raised Ferritin Levels (Iron) Reduced with Correcting Vitamin D Deficiency

A new study shows that correcting a deficiency in VITAMIN D is associated with a reduction in IRON levels (Ferritin – the body’s stored iron), which is frequently raised during inflammation.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

AUTUMN PROJECT LAUNCHES TO BENEFIT BANT MEMBERS

Summer is finally here and many of us are preparing for well deserved holidays. I talked about improved communications from us to you, our members, in my last Chair Report in July issue of BANT eNews and in the spirit of this wish to let you know that we are still engaged in multitude of political and regulatory topics and discussions to ensure the longevity of our profession, and we will continue to do so while you are enjoying your break. Bear with us on this, we will let you know more about it all as soon as we can.

Click here to read the full eblast.

Nutrition Evidence Database – 6mg of Caffeine May Maximise High Muscle Power Physical Performance

A new study shows that taking 6mg of CAFFEINE may be used to maximise physical performance involving high demands on muscle power.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRTION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

HELEN MCCARTHY, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST, PRESENTS HOW TO RETRAIN YOUR APPETITE

This webinar looks at weight loss from a clinical psychologist perspective, following Helen McCarthy’s ‘Appetite retraining’ model.

The topics covered include:

  • Why conventional diets fail
  • The biology of the human appetite system
  • The Appetite Pendulum (TM)  and how to use it
  • The psychology of habit formation and habit change
  • Working Memory and its role in habit change
  • A summary of types of self-sabotage

Click here for the full eblast.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Poor Sleep Affects Food Choices

A new study shows that a poor night of SLEEP affects our food choices.  We are hungrier, eat bigger portions, experience food cravings, and tend to reward ourselves with sweet treats.  All BANT registered Nutrition Practitioners will review your sleep as part of a routine nutrition consultation. 

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

BANT Cautions Against Dropping Policies that Support Reduced Consumption of Ultra-Processed Foods

Ultra-processed foods and drinks (UPFD) are constantly in the media nowadays. A series of recent scientific studies have highlighted how bad they are for human health and we at BANT repeatedly recommend that this category of foods and drinks is avoided as much as possible.  In a world where the scientific community and the media, contradicts itself from one day to the next, what is the truth about UPFDs? What are they? Are they really that bad for your health? BANT explains: 

Ultra-Processed Foods and Drinks – the Official Definition

In 2013, following endless debates that the term processed foods was misleading, because every food that is prepared is processed to some degree, even from fresh ingredients at home, the NOVA Classification was defined by Brazilian researcher, Carlos Monteiro. In summary, the definition says that an UPFD is an industrialised formulation of five or more ingredients including flavour injections, sugars, chemical preservatives and fats added at the final stage of processing in an industrial food plant. Here is the definition in full:

 Ultra-Processed Foods, A New Name for an Old Food Category

Ultra-processed is relatively new term for something that has been around since 1954 when the first TV dinner was launched. In previous guises they have been known as: TV dinners; convenience foods; ready meals; processed foods; microwave meals; snacks and confectionary.

European surveys show that ultra-processed foods now account for 50.4% of total dietary energy, with baked goods and fizzy drinks being the most popular UPFDs. Young people from lower income families tend to be the highest consumers due to their affordability and perceived pleasure. It is understandable that if you can’t afford many treats, meeting at a local, known-brand, fast-food outlet is a simple and affordable pleasure. That being said, ultra-processed foods are attractive to all consumers thanks to the massive marketing budgets weighted behind them.  A recent Brazilian study showed that already by the age of six, a massive 40.3% of total food intake came from UPFDs.

Ultra-Processed Foods and Drinks – the Growing Ill-Health Connection

Recently published scientific studies looking into UPFDs and the human health connection have found many links to, amongst others: cancer; CVD; inflammatory bowel disease; respiratory disease; obesity and Type 2 Diabetes. The exact reasons why these foods are so bad for health are still unknown, but several theories have been and are being investigated including high levels of sugar; fat; salt; food additives; contaminants formed during high heat processing and chemicals used in packaging. Despite having been irrefutably proven to be detrimental to health, trans fats, whilst being phased out of the human food chain, are still present in some UPFDs, according to a 2018 SACN (Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition) report.

So, what?

In conclusion, whilst the research community is unanimous in its findings that the ultra-processed food and drink category is bad for human health, there are still questions and inconclusive results relating to the individual ingredients that may be the triggering factors. High fat; salt; sugar; flavourings; additives; fillers; emulsifiers and meat quality have all been in the spotlight. What is likely, but not yet scientifically proven, is that the cocktail of many of these individual ingredients working in combination is the determining factor.

Whilst we do live in the ‘Age of Convenience’, thanks to the busy lives we now all lead, there are things that could be done to encourage the protection of the nation’s health. BANT has repeatedly called for a revised approach to nutrition education and support. Without the reintroduction of home economics in schools, many children never learn to cook with simple ingredients and as they grow into adults, they, themselves, are unable to pass on any food preparation knowledge to their own children. 

Here are BANT’s top tips for Nutrition in the Age of Convenience

  • Make minimally processed ingredients the heart of your eating. Fresh, tinned or frozen vegetables and fruits; meats/fish/dairy/tofu; legumes; nuts and seeds; dairy and eggs.
  • Avoid any foods that list more than 5 ingredients and especially any foods that list ingredients that you find difficult to pronounce.
  • Limit foods that include the word ‘fortified’ or ‘added’ followed by vitamins and minerals. If the food manufacturer has had to add it in, then it was stripped out during processing.
  • If your school doesn’t have any form of cooking classes or after school clubs, consider finding one for the school holidays. Children who cook are known to be more experimental in their tastes and they can treat their families to a home-cooked meal every so often.
  • Ultra-processed foods are heavily marketed as ‘convenient’, but it takes no longer to make scrambled eggs on toast than it does to heat a frozen-ready meal in the microwave.
  • Eating a more minimally processed focused diet does need a bit more planning and cooking, but by doubling quantities you can either freeze the uneaten batch if your freezer is big enough or you can use the second batch for lunchboxes for work or school.
  • Ultra-processed foods and drinks are not a treat. Marketing and advertising have convinced us that a treat isn’t a treat if it doesn’t include something, salty and sugary to eat or drink. Consider offering connected moments: a trip to the playground, a board-game or a simple, home-cooked romantic meal, instead of putting your health at risk for a fleeting moment of an UPFD offering.

BANT has its reservations relating to the Sugar Tax, please click here for the organisation’s original release.

This article has been abridged from a fully referenced, academic article published for BANT members. If you are interested in receiving the full article, please email: [email protected]

 

Nutrition Evidence Database – Yerba Mate Tea Demonstrates Protective Effects Against Hardening of the Arteries

YERBA MATE, a popular tea drunk in south and central America, demonstrates protective effects against hardening and thickening of the arteries, in a scientific study.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.