Monthly Archives: January 2019

Nutrition Evidence Database Alert – Nutrition and Neurodevelopment

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Nutrition plays a crucial role in linking developmental neurobiology and cognitive neuroscience. It has a profound impact on the development of brain structure and function, with nutrition imbalances potentially resulting in developmental dysfunction and disease in later life. Additionally, emerging science is starting to document how the way we feed our gut microbes also has an indisputable effect on brain health.

In this issue of the Nutrition Evidence Alert you will find 95 Plain Language Summaries – including 50 randomised controlled trials – focusing on the role of nutrition in brain health. The aim of this issue is to help you achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the processes involved in neurobehavioral and neurodegenerative disorders. Our indexing team was particularly interested in how individualised nutritional strategies might help prevent these conditions, as well as how gut microbial balance might contribute to improved quality of life.

 

Access Plain Language Summaries on Nutrition and Neurobehavioural / Neurodevelopmental Health >

 

 

Meet The Editor: Dr Kate Lawrence

“Hello! I’m Kate, a psychology lecturer and researcher into emotional and social development with a special interest in how the microbiome influences mental health and well-being.”   

After Kate gained her BA (Hons) First Class in Psychology at Oxford University in 1997 she was involved in research work at Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Institute of Child Health. She was awarded a PhD in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at UCL in 2003 with a focus on social and emotional skills in individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorders, Turner syndrome, and typically developing children, adolescents and adults. Since then Kate has been involved in a range of national and international multidisciplinary collaborative projects incorporating psychology, genetics and neuroscience.

From 2013 Kate has been working on the psychology programme at St Mary’s University Twickenham where she has been publishing interesting discoveries about the influence of age, gender and puberty on emotional development, together with collaborators at UCL.

At present Kate is currently working on a project with nutritional therapist Jeannette Hyde, looking at the influence of dietary microbiome manipulations on physical and emotional wellbeing.

Kate’s editorial picks for you this month are as follows:

Dietary Considerations in Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Potential Role of Protein Digestion and Microbial Putrefaction in the Gut-Brain Axis >

Microbiome-Gut-Brain Axis and Toll-Like Receptors in Parkinson’s Disease >

Gut microbiota, cognitive frailty and dementia in older individuals: a systematic review >

Microbiota Transfer Therapy alters gut ecosystem and improves gastrointestinal and autism symptoms: an open-label study >

 

Nutrition Evidence – Do Nutrition Labels Influence Healthier Food Purchases?

Do NUTRITION LABELS influence HEALTHIER FOOD purchases?  A new analysis of food label viewing behaviour shows that consumers look at around 1/5 of purchased products labels, focusing mainly on convenience foods, breads and oils.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.  Read it here.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence – Very Low Energy Diets Found Acceptable in Motivated Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Very LOW-ENERGY diets leading to significant weight loss are found to be acceptable and feasible in motivated patients with Type 2 DIABETES, a new small study finds.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/28727247?term=28727247.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

RENEWAL REMINDER

You are receiving this email because our records show that you have not renewed your memebership yet. If you are in the process of upgrading your membership, you can ignore this email. If you believe you have renewed and are receiving this email please contact me at generalmanager@bant.org.uk.

The BANT 2019 online membership renewal process is now open and you have until 31st January 2019 to renew your membership. If you missed the membership renewal notice and would like to be reminded why it is so essential to renew your membership click here.

Click here to access the full eblast.

BANT Cautiously Welcomes EAT-Lancet Commission On Healthy Diets from Sustainable Food Systems but has Reservations

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) was interested to read ‘Our Food in the Anthropocene: Healthy Diets from Sustainable Food Systems’, by The EAT-Lancet Commission. Whilst BANT fully supports considerations that contribute to the urgent environmental debate, it feels obliged to sound a note of caution on some of the specific nutrient recommendations made.

As BANT has reiterated many times in the past, its practitioners do not suggest ‘one-size-fits-all’ advice but take into account individuality that enables personalisation of dietary advice based on the most up-to-date research available.  BANT practitioners are made up of omnivores, flexitarians, vegetarians and vegans amongst others, and they support clients who also have a range of dietary preferences that are equally diverse. The key is to respect our client’s health, whilst encouraging sustainable and respectful eating to save our planet.

BANT supports the report’s recommendations that half a person’s plate should be comprised of vegetables, a quarter whole grains and a quarter protein, this indeed, is what the organisation has been promoting since the launch of its Wellbeing Guidelines (see image) in 2016. BANT also supports the recommendation of no/low intake of processed foods and added sugar. The reduction of food wastage is also a report recommendation BANT fully supports.

However, BANT does sound a note of caution regarding some of the more draconian recommendations. Humans are, physiologically and metabolically, omnivores and for some members of the population reducing the amount of animal protein to the levels recommended within the report, may be problematic without supplementation or intake of fortified foods (14g of red meat a day – about half a meatball, and 1.5 eggs per week, for example). BANT believes that there are other earth sustainable solutions, which also respect livestock, such as prioritising fresh, locally farmed ingredients, including grass-fed meat, over meat sources from unsustainable farming practices and industrialised ultra-processed, packaged foods.

Overall the goal to support the increased intake of plant-based foods, including legumes, pulses and nuts, with moderate consumption of red meat and added sugars is sound advice and BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the health of the individuals.

Ends 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Daniel O’Shaughnessy/Jessica Fonteneau

Communications@bant.org.uk        Tel: +44 870 606 1284

 NOTES TO EDITORS:

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT)is the professional body for Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners. Its primary function is to assist its members in attaining the highest standards of integrity, knowledge, competence and professional practice, in order to protect the client’s interests; nutritional therapy and the registered nutrition practitioner.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Paper – Can a LOW GI diet impact on MIGRAINES?

A new RCT finds that a low GI diet can be an effective and reliable method to reduce migraine attacks, as effective as standard treatment with pharmaceuticals.

This trial has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/29450870?term=29450870.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?

The next alert is due out imminently, so sign up quickly so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Paper – Increased Protein and Moderate Calorie Restriction Effective in Reducing Insulin Resistance

A small study finds that increased PROTEIN consumption with moderate calorie restriction was 140% more effective for reducing INSULIN RESISTANCE compared to a conventional, calorie-matched diet.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/29143803?term=29143803.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.