Monthly Archives: September 2016

Sarah Dumont-Gale, Institute for Optimal Nutrition

My journey to study Nutritional Therapy started for me when I was 18 and living in Spain, away from home for the first time.  A row of tequilas was my pre-drinking tipple and my kitchen cupboards were bare apart from a few packet of crisps, just incase my hangover wasn’t at code red and I could stomach some salty snacks. I am happy to say that this life binge was short lived, but after finishing university and going back home my body made me pay the price.  I spent the next few years feeling sluggish, in pain, with a low mood even though I ate what I thought was a balanced diet, and exercised.  I had a regular date with the doctor and each time he fobbed me off with more painkillers for the headaches or nausea tablets for my growling stomach.  I was even offered anti-depressants, which I immediately declined.  After almost a year I broke off my relationship with the doctor, as it just wasn’t working, and it was definitely him not me.

I then sought out a Nutritional Therapist who suggested a food intolerance test.  My test came back flagging gluten, dairy and eggs, and whilst I was relieved to finally have an action plan, my first question was ‘HOW AM I GOING TO EAT?!’.  It was a shock to the system but with the help of my Nutritional Therapist, a lot of research and self-experimentation (and failed recipe testing), I have slowly refined my diet and started to heal my body.

My own healing and the amazement of what food can do, fuelled my want to learn more about this amazing subject, which lead me to enrol with the Institute for Optimum Nutrition.  I am simply fascinated at what the body is capable of and how harmoniously it can function when provided with the correct fuel.   Along side this, I have a passion to help people just as I was helped, so hopefully one day I can inspire someone, just as I was inspired.

Sarah is currently studying with the Institute of Optimum Nutrition (eNTDC) and has just started year two of the Nutritional Therapy Diploma Course after first completing the Science Access Course. 

Student News Bulletin

This fortnight, an expensive textbook is now available free online, eating nuts is linked to healthy biomarkers of inflammation, the first of a new series highlighting benefits available to BANT students, and a recipe for a warming saffron, cauliflower and tahini soup.

 

Core student textbook available online

Students will be pleased to hear they now have access to the textbook Laboratory Evaluations for Integrative and Functional Medicines by RS Lord and JA Bralley. It is an organised explanation of the various tests available in clinical practise, their interpretation and clinical application. This valuable tome is very hard to get hold of and, if you do manage to lay your hands on a copy, it can be very expensive. So to be able to read it free online is a great advantage. Access it here.

Study shows that eating nuts is associated with lower inflammatory biomarkers

Increasing our consumption of nuts has been linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes and a healthy lipid profile. A study recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition sought to investigate the associations between eating nuts and inflammatory biomarkers. The biomarkers fasting plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) were analysed from two large cohorts of men and women in America – in total 5013 subjects. These results were compared to the frequency of the consumption of nuts. After adjusting for variables, it was found that a greater intake of nuts (3 servings a week, substituting for red and processed meat, eggs or refined grains) was associated with lower levels of inflammatory markers. Read more here.

 

BANT student member benefits

Benefits for student members of BANT are often overlooked, but are numerous and often extremely useful. In order to make sure students are getting the most out of their membership, we are running a series highlighting each one to make sure nobody misses out.

One of the most helpful to students in clinic and with assignments is access to the Natural Medicines Database. Normally, the cost to subscribe is £149 but we get access for free. Included in this free subscription is

  • Interaction checker between all drugs and different natural medicines
  • Effectiveness checker, to compare the effectiveness of a natural medicine for a specific condition
  • Nutrient depletion checker
  • In-depth evidence tables and comprehensive review of evidence
  • Pregnancy and lactation checker including adverse effects
  • Client handouts and consumer monographs in English, Spanish and French

BANT provides a link to the Database via the Centre of Excellence area, under Evidence-Based Database. Visit the Natural Medicines Database from the BANT website here

 

Warming saffron and cauliflower soup

Ingredients

  • 200g cauliflower
  • A pinch of saffron
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 small clove garlic, diced
  • ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
  • 350ml water
  • 1 tablespoon tahini
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • Salt and pepper

Method

  • Chop the cauliflower into small pieces and place in a large saucepan along with the saffron, bay leaf, garlic and mustard seeds.
  • Cover with 350ml water and bring to the boil. Once it has boiled, turn down to simmer for a further 15 minutes.
  • Stick a knife in the cauliflower after this time to check it is tender. If not, leave it for a further 5 minutes.
  • Once cooked, transfer it to a blender along with the tahini and lemon juice. If using an immersion (stick) blender, just add the tahini and lemon juice directly to the pan.
  • Blend until smooth and creamy, seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. If eating straight away, transfer back to the pan to warm it up.
  • Serve sprinkled with sesame seeds, a drizzle of olive oil and a good hunk of well buttered bread.

Recipe by Rosalind Bates of A Manner of Eating. View the recipe here.

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Student News Bulletin

NEWS FLASH!  Free BANT Student Webinar: Mediterranean diet as a naturally occurring model for neuroprotection/brain health – Thurs 22 Sep at 7.30pm

In case you missed the email, Miguel Toribio-Mateas, an engaging speaker and also BANT chairman, is giving us a free BANT Student Webinar: Mediterranean diet as a naturally occurring model for neuroprotection/brain health – Thurs 22 Sep at 7.30pm.

Join us for our next BANT Student Webinar on ‘Mediterranean diet as a naturally occurring model for neuroprotection/brain health’ presented by Miguel Toribio-Mateas. The webinar will take place on Thurs 22 Sep from 7.30-8.30pm. The webinar is free and exclusively for BANT student members!

In his webinar Miguel will draw from his own firsthand experience of the Mediterranean diet, as well as from his recent research experience on neuroprotection working on mitochondrial gene expression with neural stem cells at the University of Roehampton as part of his MSc in Clinical Neuroscience. He will translate the benefits of a Mediterranean-style diet into an evidence-based model for brain protection and cognitive enhancement that includes both foods and multiple food supplements.

Please check your inbox  or contact studentwebinars@bant.org.uk and provide your BANT membership number in order to receive the registration link. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. View System Requirements for attending the webinar.

If you would like to ask questions of Miguel prior to the webinar, please go to www.linkedin.com/groups/BANT-Student-Members-Group-4061266. There will be a chance to ask questions at the end of the webinar also and we will continue the discussion on the BANT Student Network LinkedIn Group above.

Recordings of previous student webinars are now found on the student member section of the BANT website at http://bant.org.uk/members-area/student-area/previous-webinars/.

Best wishes,

The BANT Student Network Team

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BANT September New Goes Live

Welcome to the September issue of BANT ENews, this month is all about Practice Management. A little bit of a head start for our newly graduated members who are taking their first steps as Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners and some helpful hints and tips for our more seasoned members. Included in the issue are an article on ‘How to Organise a Retreat’ from our Communications Director, Daniel O’Shaughnessy, a review of the practice management software tool Cliniko and a brand new ‘Spotlight on the BANT Website’ feature, to help you get the most of all of the information BANT has developed/centralised especially for you. Access the BANT news here.

SEPTEMBER BANT NEWS

Welcome to the September issue of BANT ENews, this month is all about Practice Management. A little bit of a head start for our newly graduated members who are taking their first steps as Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners and some helpful hints and tips for our more seasoned members. Included in the issue are an article on ‘How to Organise a Retreat’ from our Communications Director, Daniel O’Shaughnessy, a review of the practice management software tool Cliniko and a brand new ‘Spotlight on the BANT Website’ feature, to help you get the most of all of the information BANT has developed/centralised especially for you.

View the BANT News

View the eblast

Student News Bulletin

This bulletin looks at the protection vitamin D may offer for cognition, as discussed by French researchers.  The influence that our gut microbes may exert over our behaviour.  And the exclusive student offer available for CAM Expo.

The Therapeutic Benefit of Vitamin D?

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, the chairman of BANT, this week highlighted research published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease from Aix Marseille Université.  The review discusses the evidence for the effect of vitamin D on cognition.  Low levels of vitamin D, now described as a steroid hormone, are associated with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).  Indeed, individuals with genetic variations related to vitamin D receptors (VDR) affecting the uptake and utilisation of vitamin D , “presented with worse cognitive functioning”.  It was concluded that the impact of vitamin D is context specific and maybe even gender dependent so, “the D-tails of every individual” should be taken into account going forward.  Read more here.

Gut bacteria and the brain: Are we controlled by microbes?

The microbiome’s role in health and disease is only slowly giving up its secrets. The latest and perhaps most remarkable finding is the ability that gut bacteria have to moderate our brain and behaviour.  A meta-analysis in Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility concluded that, “probiotics showed efficacy in improving psychiatric disorder-related behaviors including anxiety, depression, autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and memory abilities, including spatial and non-spatial memory.” Read more here.

Special Student Offer for CAM Expo

camexpo is the UK’s biggest natural health & wellbeing event and students can attend for just £5, saving £20 on the door price and groups of 10 or more can attend for free!

>>Book your BANT Student Saver Ticket here

There are over 200 suppliers to see under one roof and lots of money-saving offers as well as over 100 education sessions hosted by the UK’s leading trainers so this is the best opportunity you have this year to get into the natural health community and learn some of the latest trends from some of the best in the business.

Education programme:

Taster Workshops  – get hands on at 47 Workshops with leading trainers (priced at £19.50 each)
Keynote Seminars – Latest research and trends delivered by free to attend with your entry ticket
Nutrition Theatre Nutrition-based seminars with leading experts, free to attend with your entry ticket
Business Clinic Sessions that will put you one step ahead when you come to start your own business. Free to attend but you can reserve seats in your chosen sessions for £10 each.
Demo Theatre – Suppliers deliver the latest products and services to hit the market
Speakers – take a look at who’s speaking at camexpo here.

>>Book your BANT Student Saver Ticket here cheap air max 95

BANT Comments on the Study Published in the JAMA Pediatrics Regarding ‘Caesarean Delivery May Increase Childhood Risk of Obesity’

BANT read with interest the widely publicised study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, that found that “caesarean delivery can increase a child’s risk of obesity into adulthood, compared to their siblings who were born naturally”.  The hypothesis put forward by the study’s authors is that the higher risk of obesity observed may be due to the difference in exposure of beneficial gut bacteria (gastrointestinal microbiota) experienced by babies born by c-section versus those born via the birth canal.

Tim Spector, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at King’s College London and a consultant physician at Guy’s and St Thomas’s Hospital stated on behalf of BANT: “This new study from Harvard of 20,000 births confirms 6 previous observational studies showing C section babies have a 15 percent increased risk of obesity. Other studies have shown increases in allergy. A lack of natural gut microbes is the likely cause”.

A study by Shen TC et al., (2016) recently highlighted that a diet a person consumers over a year is closely linked to the composition of their gut bacteria. For example, a person who eats a carbohydrate heavy diet (pasta, rice, potatoes and refined sugars) is more likely to have an abundance of the Prevotella bacteria, whereas a person who has a more protein (meat) based diet will have a preponderance of Bacteriods. Diet, therefore, is vitally important to beneficial bacteria.

Registered Nutritional Therapists are acutely aware of how important the gut, and its resident bacteria, is both in terms of obesity risk, but also in relation to other health conditions and are able to provide individualised client recommendations to support gut health.  BANT registered practitioners are insured to recommend supplements such as probiotics and prebiotics where needed. This is after thorough assessment based on clinical practice framework which takes into account test results. BANT Registered Nutritional Therapists are uniquely trained to prescribe food supplements with caution, assess supplement quality, know supplement interactions with medications and appropriate dosing for the individual client.

BANT Registered Nutritional Therapists take into account individuality that enables personalisation of dietary advice based on the most up-to-date research available. They do not endorse or promote ‘one-size-fits-all’ advice following the health trend of the moment.

How to find your BANT Registered Nutritional Therapist

BANT, The British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy, recommends that you choose a Registered Nutritional Therapist who has undertaken training at an accredited course thereby ensuring necessary training to understand the theory and practice of nutritional therapy. BANT-member Registered Nutritional Therapists are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). The CNHC holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). The PSA oversees statutory bodies and accredits organisations holding voluntary registers for health and social care occupations in the UK. By choosing Registered Nutritional Therapist, registered with the CNHC, you can be confident that they are properly trained, qualified and insured.

To find a BANT Registered Nutritional Therapist in your area click on the link: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces

– Ends –

Click here to download the PDF version of this response.

References:

Shen TC, Chehoud C, Ni J, Hsu E;  Chen YY, Bailey A, Laughlin A, Bittinger K, Bushman FD, Wu GD (2016) Dietary Regulation of the Gut Microbiota Engineered by a Minimal Defined Bacterial Consortium. PLoS One. 13;11(5):e0155620. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0155620. eCollection 2016.

 

BANT Comments on Vitamin D – For Bones and Muscle, but Not Only

BANT welcomes the news that the lead researchers of an independent review by the Cochrane research body (the absolute gold standard) have announced that taking Vitamin D supplements in addition to asthma medication appears to cut the risk of severe asthma attacks and cut the rates of steroid treatment.

BANT was disappointed by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition’s (SACN) recent recommendation to Public Health England (PHE) that vitamin D supplementation could only be recommended for bone and muscle health, despite all of the scientific evidence to the contrary.

Did SACN not find any correlations because of its own criteria?  “Clinical advice to high risk women (obesity; darker skinned and reduced exposure to sunlight) is outside SACN’s remit”.  BANT feels that ignoring thousands of animal, in vitro, genetic, and epidemiologic studies that have linked vitamin D deficiency with the development of autoimmune disease and other conditions is a missed opportunity and questions how PHE plans to measure the damage done to those who are not benefiting from appropriate governmental advice.

BANT Chairman Miguel Toribio-Mateas said: “Vitamin D has traditionally been known for its role in bone metabolism, but emerging evidence suggests a much broader role for vitamin D in immune regulation. In fact, vitamin D deficiency has been associated as a contributor to the pathogenesis and severity of diverse autoimmune disorders, from autoimmune bowel conditions like coeliac disease to rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and multiple sclerosis; some of the main reasons individuals seek advice from our members.

Despite the fact that it has been clear for 20 years that vitamin D is necessary for muscle and bone health, amended government advice has only just been released. If I were a muscle or bone condition sufferer, who has not been supplementing daily with the now recommended 10 micrograms of extra vitamin D that I am only now being told I must take because PHE’s nutritionists debated whether published evidence was robust enough to recommend supplements, I would be furious. I would, in fact, be tempted to sue PHE for damages to my health resulting from the inability of government scientists to spot the direction of travel in science, the outcome of which is damage to the health of millions of individuals who could have been enjoying better health for years.“

Personalisation

There is consistent scientific evidence that in some people with variants in vitamin D metabolism and vitamin D-receptor genes the ability to convert vitamin D into a usable form is compromised meaning, that these individuals may remain deficient despite supplementation. Thus knowing about these genetic variants would allow an appropriately trained practitioner to provide a vitamin D protocol that is tailored to these individuals’ needs. As shown in clinical trials conducted in a variety of countries around the world, a simple blood test that measures serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D confirms that even when vitamin D is supplemented at modest levels, like the 10μg (400IU) proposed by Public Health England, some people will continue to have inadequate vitamin D levels.  Additionally, some of the foods that are traditionally fortified with vitamin D, like flour made from milled cereals, used for bread-making and in most commercially available breakfast cereals, are also associated with higher levels of diet-driven inflammation, known as Dietary Inflammatory Index.

Where can you find sources of vitamin D?

Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin whose primary source is sunlight. Very few foods contain vitamin D, hence the recommendation for supplementation.

From foods

Food sources of vitamin D include sardines, cod liver (available as a pate that can be used as a savoury spread), tinned tuna, liver, eggs. However, please note that food sources are notoriously poor. With regards to fortified foods (the equivalent of taking a supplement that’s been added to your food) like orange juice, breakfast cereals BANT considers that these may be useful for those individuals who are not able to eat any other sources of vitamin D or to supplement, but strongly advises to read the labels and check for sugar content, both natural sugars and added (sucrose and fructose in many cases) as well as other undesirable ingredients.

From supplements

Vitamin D comes in two forms: D2 (ergocalciferol) and D3 (cholecalciferol). Vitamin D2 is manufactured by the UV irradiation of ergosterol in yeast, and vitamin D3 is made by the irradiation of 7-dehydrocholesterol from lanolin and the chemical conversion of cholesterol.

Both forms have been regarded as equivalent, based on their ability to combat rickets and, indeed, most steps involved in the metabolism and actions of both forms are identical and both forms effectively raise serum 25(OH)D levels. However, studies have shown that high doses of Vitamin D2 are less potent and thus BANT recommends supplementing with Vitamin D3.

How much will I need? 

RNT’s are able to provide individualised recommendations.  BANT registered practitioners are insured to recommend supplements where needed. This is after thorough assessment based on clinical practice framework which takes into account test results. BANT Registered Nutritional Therapists are uniquely trained to prescribe food supplements with caution, assess supplement quality, know supplement interactions with medications and appropriate dosing for the individual client.

BANT Registered Nutritional Therapists take into account individuality that enables personalisation of dietary advice based on the most up-to-date research available. They do not endorse or promote ‘one-size-fits-all’ advice following the health trend of the moment.

How to find your BANT Registered Nutritional Therapist

BANT, The British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy, recommends that you choose a Registered Nutritional Therapist who has undertaken training at an accredited course thereby ensuring necessary training to understand the theory and practice of nutritional therapy. BANT-member Registered Nutritional Therapists are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). The CNHC holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). The PSA oversees statutory bodies and accredits organisations holding voluntary registers for health and social care occupations in the UK. By choosing Registered Nutritional Therapist, registered with the CNHC, you can be confident that they are properly trained, qualified and insured.

To find a BANT Registered Nutritional Therapist in your area click on the link: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces

– Ends –

Click here to download the PDF version of this statement.

References:

  1. Barry, E. L., Rees, J. R., Peacock, J. L., Mott, L. A., Amos, C. I., Bostick, R. M., Figueiredo, J. C., Ahnen, D. J., Bresalier, R. S., Burke, C. A. & Baron, J. A. (2014) Genetic variants in CYP2R1, CYP24A1, and VDR modify the efficacy of vitamin D3 supplementation for increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in a randomized controlled trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 99(10) pp. E2133-7.
  2. Cantorna, M. T., Mcdaniel, K., Bora, S., Chen, J. & James, J. (2014) Vitamin D, immune regulation, the microbiota, and inflammatory bowel disease. Exp Biol Med (Maywood), 239(11) pp. 1524-30.
  3. Chowdhury, R., Kunutsor, S., Vitezova, A., Oliver-Williams, C., Chowdhury, S., Kiefte-De-Jong, J. C., Khan, H., Baena, C. P., Prabhakaran, D., Hoshen, M. B., Feldman, B. S., Pan, A., Johnson, L., Crowe, F., Hu, F. B. & Franco, O. H. (2014) Vitamin D and risk of cause specific death: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational cohort and randomised intervention studies. Bmj, g1903.
  4. Delvin, E., Souberbielle, J. C., Viard, J. P. & Salle, B. (2014) Role of vitamin D in acquired immune and autoimmune diseases. Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci,51(4) pp. 232-47.
  5. De Medeiros Cavalcante, I. G., Silva, A. S., Costa, M. J., Persuhn, D. C., Issa, C. T., De Luna Freire, T. L. & Da Conceicao Rodrigues Goncalves, M. (2015) Effect of vitamin D3 supplementation and influence of BsmI polymorphism of the VDR gene of the inflammatory profile and oxidative stress in elderly women with vitamin D insufficiency: Vitamin D3 megadose reduces inflammatory markers. Exp Gerontol, 10-6.
  6. Gonzalez-Gil, E. M., Santabarbara, J., Russo, P., Ahrens, W., Claessens, M., Lissner, L., Bornhorst, C., Krogh, V., Iacoviello, L., Molnar, D., Siani, A., Tornaritis, M., Veidebaum, T. & Moreno, L. A. (2015) Food intake and inflammation in European children: the IDEFICS study. Eur J Nutr, [Epub ahead of print]
  7. Liu, Z., Liu, L., Chen, X., He, W. & Yu, X. (2014) Associations study of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms with diabetic microvascular complications: a meta-analysis. Gene, 546(1) pp. 6-10.
  8. National Institutes of Health of the United States of America (2016) Vitamin D Factsheet for Health Professionals. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/#en2. Accessed online Thursday 21st July 2016.
  9. Romagnoli E, Pepe J, Piemonte S, Cipriani C, Minisola S (2013) Management of endocrine disease: value and limitations of assessing vitamin D nutritional status and advised levels of vitamin D supplementation. European Journal of Endocrinology. 169: R59-69.
  10. Shivappa, N., Hebert, J. R., Rosato, V., Rossi, M., Montella, M., Serraino, D. & La Vecchia, C. (2016) Dietary inflammatory index and ovarian cancer risk in a large Italian case-control study. Cancer Causes Control, 27(7) pp. 897-906.

 

CAMEXPO 2016 to Showcase Latest Innovations in Nutrition

Taking place at Olympia London, later this month on 24-25 September, camexpo’s dedicated Nutrition Theatre (sponsored by Wiley’s Finest) will run 17 CPD-accredited sessions across two days.  Confirmed speakers include leading nutritional experts like BANT’s Miguel Toribio-Mateas, Dr Marilyn Glenville, Gudrun Jonsson, Dr Robert Verkerk, Antony Haynes, Umahro Cadogan, Dr. Armin Schwarzbach, and Nadia Brydon.

Digestive health, vitamin K2 deficiencies, superfoods, childhood obesity, brain health, natural alternatives to sugar, and the benefits of the Mediterranean diet are just some of the hot topics under discussion for 2016.

Dr Sarah Brewer, Dale Pinnock, Christine Bailey, Professor Robert Thomas, and Elizabeth Butler will also be focusing on diet and nutrition in their Keynote Theatre sessions. See the full Nutrition Theatre line-up here and the Keynote Theatre line-up here.

Focus on: vitamins and supplements
Whilst Vitamin D might be getting all the press lately, the multivitamin is still far and away the UK’s top seller, according to the latest data from Euromonitor International.  Fish oils/omega fatty acids, herbal/traditional dietary supplements, glucosamine, vitamins C and B, and probiotics also appeared in the list of top ten bestsellers.

“I think it is important for everyone to have a multivitamin and mineral, as it forms the foundation of any supplement programme.  Also a lot of people are ‘overfed and undernourished’, so a multi gives them a broad range of valuable nutrients,” says Dr Marilyn Glenville.

Euromonitor’s report shows that UK sales of vitamins and dietary supplements reached £879.3m in 2015 (up 1.7%).  Increasing health awareness among UK consumers is fueling that demand.

Of course, there is no one size fits all approach when it comes to nutritional health and wellbeing.  Providing personalised diet plans, including beneficial supplements (when necessary), is a subject that many nutritional therapists and practitioners are already well-versed.  And those that can be quick to adapt to the latest trends, innovations and research have much to gain and a visit to camexpo will provide you with all you need.

Over 200 exhibiting brands:
camexpo’s 200-strong exhibitor list features some familiar VMS suppliers previewing their next wave of new products for the autumn/winter season.  Among them are Pukka Herbs, A Vogel (Bioforce UK), The Really Healthy Company, Synergy – The LP Partnership, Nucleotide Nutrition, Nature’s Plus, Good Health Naturally, Wild Nutrition, The Natural Health Practice, Hifas da Terra, Living Nutrition, Bio Pathica, Renew Life UK, The G&G Vitamin Centre, Bionutri, Biodane Pharma, Rio Trading Company Health, Vega Nutritional, Cell Nutrition Quinton, Bestcare, Nutri-Globe, Chris James Mind Body, Bio-Kult, Lepicol, and Wiley’s Finest UK. View the Full Exhibitor list online here.

“camexpo is the most comprehensive and delicious learning and professional development feast for CAM practitioners in the UK.  I love the fact each year camexpo just keeps getting better and better!  I am increasingly impressed by the diversity of practitioners who come to camexpo to develop their knowledge and skills.  It’s a privilege to be able to speak to a group of people, who are on one hand insufficiently recognised by society, and, on the other hand function at the coalface of health, providing services that consistently transform lives for the better,” says popular show speaker Dr Robert Verkerk, founder of Alliance for Natural Health International.

New for 2016, all workshops and seminars at the show are now CPD-accredited.

To book your special reduced ticket through BANT for just 38.50 (saving £16.50 on the door) to book an entry ticket for £8.50 (saving £16.50 off the door charge), use this link: https://bant.org.uk/members-area/member-resources/special-offers-for-bant-members/camexpo/  nike air max cheap wholesale