Monthly Archives: June 2019

BANT Unsurprised By ‘From Cradle to Grave’ Marketing Strategies Found by Public Health England’s ‘Commercial Infant and Baby Food and Drink: Evidence Review’

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) is shocked but unsurprised that Public Health England’s (PHE) ‘Commercial Infant and Baby Food and Drink: Evidence Review’found that food manufacturers of ultra-processed foods and drinks (UPFDs) are aggressively targeting the infant and baby food and drink market.  A recent article, published by BANT, quoted studies that showed that the greatest growth in UPFD consumption can be seen in the early-year age-groups. A study investigating early year consumption of UPFDs found that 40.3% of total energy intake of Brazilian 6-year old’s was from the UPFD category (Louzada et al., 2018).

The food industry has a very clear objective, to encourage the maximum consumption of UPFDs from cradle to grave. By introducing added sweetness to foods and drinks marketed as suitable, and even as healthy, for infants and babies, taste buds are being trained from the earliest age to crave sweet substances, establishing a faithful clientele for the future and creating the foundations for the obesity and related conditions crises.

Study after study has been published highlighting the links between UPFD consumption and all-cause mortality. BANT has repeatedly asked why the UPFD health risk is being taken so lightly and why the focus isn’t returned to the promotion of simple, wholesome ingredients? Nutrition education from the earliest age needs to be translated from theoretical worksheets and limited food preparation to active cooking classes. Without the reintroduction of home economics in schools many children never learn to cook with simple ingredients and as they in turn become adults, they are unable to pass food preparation knowledge to their own children. The vicious cycle fueling the reliance on ultra-processed, convenience food is well and truly established and is putting an unbearable burden on an individual’s health, let alone the nation’s healthcare services.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and avoid ultra-processed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times, and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the obesity targets and health of the individuals.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding out-dated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA).A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces

 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Daniel O’Shaughnessy

[email protected]        Tel: +44 1425 462 532.

NOTES TO EDITORS:

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT)is the professional body for Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners. Its primary function is to assist its members in attaining the highest standards of integrity, knowledge, competence and professional practice, in order to protect the client’s interests; nutritional therapy and the registered nutrition practitioner.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Call for Vitamin D Status to be Checked in Ulcerative Colitis Patients

Leading researchers in a new study call for all patients with ULCERATIVE COLITIS to be tested for their VITAMIN D status and to have their levels optimised if required.  Disease activity was reduced and quality of life increased in Vitamin D deficient patients with supplementation.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

Nutrition Evidence – Probiotics Taken When Stressed Can Buffer Cognition Effects

Do you feel that your emotional control and your memory is affected during STRESSFUL periods?  A small study shows that taking a PROBIOTIC supplement during times of stress can help buffer the effects on cognition.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.   Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Vitamin D Supplementation Pregnancy Benefits

A new systematic review on Nutrition Evidence looks at VITAMIN D supplementation and PREGNANCY outcomes.  The findings suggest that Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy can have positive benefits for birth weight, baby length and head circumference.  Whilst study quality was generally low, testing Vitamin D levels in relation to fertility could be considered.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

BANT WELCOMES PROFESSOR T SPECTOR ET AL., PREDICT 1 STUDY

Latest press release issued by BANT – please become a BANT Comms volunteer by sharing this information online: https://www.facebook.com/BANTonline/ and https://www.linkedin.com/company/2289420/admin/

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) welcomes the initial findings from the Predict 1 Study that individualised nutrition and lifestyle recommendations are key to human health. BANT members have been working with their clients offering personalised recommendations for the past 22 years, since BANT’s foundation in 1997, and were proud to have been selected to work with Professor Spector, the lead researcher on this study, on the precursor project to this study, ‘Map My Gut’.

Click here to view full eblast.

BANT Welcomes Professor Tim Spector et al., Study, Predict 1

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) welcomes the initial findings from the Predict 1 Study that individualised nutrition and lifestyle recommendations are key to human health. BANT members have been working with their clients offering personalised recommendations for the past 22 years, since BANT’s foundation in 1997, and were proud to have been selected to work with Professor Spector, the lead researcher on this study, on the precursor project to this study, ‘Map My Gut’.

The Predict 1 study confirms the nutrition ethos that BANT has been practising and promoting since its inception. BANT has repeatedly highlighted that a one-size-fits all health and nutrition policy such as Public Health England’s ‘Eat Well Plate’ is counter-productive and that the recent out-dated calorie campaign is inappropriate. Calorie counting takes little to no account of the nutritional values of different foods and their relation to an individuals’ health and the continual tinkering of out-dated nutrition science is putting the health of the British Nation at risk and is contributing to the current National Health Service crisis.

Professor Tim Spector commented “BANT Practitioners know that everyone responds differently to food because they see this in their practices on a day-to-day basis. Members of the public can experiment with this approach by signing up to joinzoe.com to be ahead of the curve when the app is available next year. Your local BANT Practitioner can help you understand your responses better to further personalise your food choices.”

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas, who worked with Professor Spector on Map My Gut said: “the preliminary results of the Predict Study are very encouraging. They support my belief that within 5 years these kind of tools will not be an option, but a necessity for nutrition practitioners to do their job effectively.”

The study was undertaken by an international team comprised of researchers from Kings College, London and Massachusetts General Hospital, alongside nutritional science company, ZOE. 1,000 participants, mostly made up of pairs of twins, consumed set meals and logged every mouthful of food or drink they consumed over a 2-week period. Blood levels of sugar, fat and the hormone insulin were monitored throughout, and data on activities, sleep patterns, hunger and gut bacteria levels were also collected. The main findings were that even amongst the genetically identical twin pairs, blood glucose, fat and hormone responses to identical foods were widely different, confirming the study’s hypothesis that no two people’s responses to individual foods are the same.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas commented: I am excited to see years of scientific data translated into a tangible application that can help change people’s lives. This type of application of nutrition science is the future of clinical practice”

Since 1997 BANT Nutrition Practitioners have practised nutrition and lifestyle medicine, described as the application of behaviour changes to benefit health and prevent disease, based on the knowledge of how diet, nutrition and the environment interact with our genes to promote long-term stability and resilience at cellular level. Nutritional therapy is the application of nutrition science in the promotion of health, peak performance and individual care. It is a progressive approach to health optimisation.

In 2017 the Royal Society for Public Health published a report that looked at the potential impact that the ‘untapped resource’ of practitioners on Accredited Registers (ARs), such as BANT, could make a significant contribution to public health. The report made a key recommendation that AR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. BANT also continues to call for some grass-roots changes to nutrition recommendations including the reintroduction of home economics classes in school; education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term; and promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and the minimisation of ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets.

Looking for a BANT Registered Nutritional Therapist is easy; just click on the link for a full listing of our Registered Nutritional Therapists area by area: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces.

 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Daniel O’Shaughnessy

[email protected]       Tel: +44 870 606 1284

NOTES TO EDITORS:

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT)is the professional body for Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners. Its primary function is to assist its members in attaining the highest standards of integrity, knowledge, competence and professional practice, in order to protect the client’s interests; nutritional therapy and the registered nutrition practitioner.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agencymade a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases. For a full copy of the report, click here: https://www.professionalstandards.org.uk/docs/default-source/publications/untapped-resources—accredited-registers-in-the-wider-workforce-november-2017.pdf?sfvrsn=0)

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here:

Nutrition Evidence – Gluten Sensitivity Association with Co-ordination, Balance and Speech Difficulties

A review finds an association between difficulties with coordination, balance and speech and/or peripheral nerve damage of unknown origin and gluten sensitivity.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

IAN CRAIG PRESENTS FUNCTIONAL APPROACHES TO SPORTS NUTRITION

Ian Craig, founder of the Centre of Integrative Sports Nutrition and author of Wholesome Nutrition, presents this month’s webinar on functional approaches to sports nutrition.

The webinar will cover the following:

  • Introduction to Sports Nutrition
  • How to apply functional approaches in the sports arena
  • How to engage in sports nutrition, even if this is not your area of expertise
  • What laboratory tests to use with your sporting clients
  • Sports nutrition case studies

Click here for the full eblast.