Monthly Archives: May 2016

Katherine Caris-Harris, Centre for Nutrition Education & Lifestyle Management (CNELM)

CaptureI decide to study nutrition as my children are growing up and I wanted to start working again, but wished to do something I felt passionately about and that would be flexible around my family.  I’ve not always followed a low-toxic diet (having enjoyed far too much alcohol than I should in my time) but have always been aware of what I was eating, probably as a result of being brought up in the middle of nowhere in Northumberland with the benefits of our own kitchen garden enforced on me from an early age.  I had a brief foray into Medicine after school but changed degrees to Economics after a year as my direction in life was unclear.  I worked as an Investment Manager but ‘retired’ when I had children and at this point began to regain my focus on nutrition.  Since the day I found out I was pregnant I have never touched another sip of diet coke (a previous staple!).

I also found my other love which is running and more recently triathlon.  I was a participant in a research project in 2013 that involved lots of Genova testing throughout our training and culminated in completing the Barcelona Ironman!  It was run by an eminent sports nutritionist and physiologist, who offered me lots of advice and, maybe unknown to him, helped me make my final decision to take the plunge into study again.  Something I always said I would never do.  He recommended CNELM to me.

I love endurance sport and people assume this is the path I will follow in my future nutrition career.  Whilst it will be one arm of what I do, I’d also like to work in practice with others, such as physios and osteopaths, perhaps with a focus on women’s health.  Plans are still evolving and I am excited about where the future may take me.

Press Release – BANT Response to Guidelines that Propose that Surgery Be Considered a Standard Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes

BANT cautions against a ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution of bariatric surgery as standard option for treatment of type 2 diabetes in obese patients. Obesity and diabetes are complex issues which require interventions at multiple levels to achieve both effective prevention and successful treatment of existing problems and where necessary, bariatric surgery may be one of the solutions. However, diabetes does not happen overnight. It happens over years of chronically raised blood sugar and insulin levels stemming from excessive refined carbohydrate intake, increased stress levels, systemic inflammation and lack of exercise. BANT recommends that GPs refer patients at risk of obesity or diabetes to Registered Nutritional Therapists or Dieticians as early as possible to give them an opportunity to manage their lifestyle and diet to avoid onset of diabetes. Click here to access the full press release.

Press Release – BANT’s Advice on What We Should Eat: Wellbeing Guidelines

BANT (British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy) was very interested to see the coverage relating to the Public Obesity Forum’s announcement. BANT recognises the need for an overhaul of public guidelines and supports urgent action on key issues affecting the health of the nation. BANT’s experts have carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimum health.  The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines (The Wellness Solution and Fight the Fat/Beat the Bloat) present the most current and well-researched information available to the public and were developed as a response to the one-size-fits-all public health guidelines. Click here to access the full press release.

MAY BANT NEWS

Welcome to the May edition of BANT ENews. This month’s edition focuses on mental health and diet, with a fascinating and useful featured article by BANT member Eleanor Strang asking whether diet is the missing link; an interesting video of Prof Rucklidge discussing the data that shows an alarming picture of food choices serving as risk factors to all kinds of psychiatric problems and a mental health themed recipe by BANT member Katherine Tate, aka ‘The Food Teacher’. This month also sees the arrival of two new sections: ‘In the News’, whereby we will be listing media coverage which includes a BANT reference, achieved by our members and ‘Noticeboard’ where organisations and individuals can solicit help for research/surveys on the proviso that the results will be published in a future BANT ENews to benefit all of our members.

View the BANT News

View the eblast

BANT May News Goes Live

Welcome to the May edition of BANT ENews. This month’s edition focuses on mental health and diet, with a fascinating and useful featured article by BANT member Eleanor Strang asking whether diet is the missing link; an interesting video of Prof Rucklidge discussing the data that shows an alarming picture of food choices serving as risk factors to all kinds of psychiatric problems and a mental health themed recipe by BANT member Katherine Tate, aka ‘The Food Teacher’. This month also sees the arrival of two new sections: ‘In the News’, whereby we will be listing media coverage which includes a BANT reference, achieved by our members and ‘Noticeboard’ where organisations and individuals can solicit help for research/surveys on the proviso that the results will be published in a future BANT ENews to benefit all of our members. Access the BANT news here.

Student News Bulletin

This week we’re highlighting two new research papers and a quick recipe to help make the most of your study time!  The first paper, from Boston researchers investigates lifestyle factors in the prevention of cancers.  The second looks at the gut microbiota of children with multiple sclerosis.

Cancer risk: Is it influenced by a healthy lifestyle?

Research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) looked at the impact of a ‘healthy lifestyle’ on the incident and mortality of cancer that could be prevented by lifestyle modifications.  A ‘healthy lifestyle’ was defined as:

  • Never smoked or given up
  • No alcohol or drinking less than one drink a day for women and 2 for men
  • BMI between 18.5 and 27.5
  • Exercising 75 minutes vigorously or 150 minutes moderately a week

Results estimated that around 20 – 40% of cancer cases and around 50% of cancer deaths could be prevented by these lifestyle modifications. Read more.

Pro-inflammatory gut bacteria levels higher in children with MS

Researchers from Canada and the USA published research in the European Journal of Neurology that analysed the gut microbial community of paediatric multiple sclerosis patients and how it may influence neurological disease.  It was concluded that the observed microbiome was pro-inflammatory and could up regulate pathways associated with neurodegeneration. Read more.

Student Recipe

What’s the ideal student food?  Something that’s quick, definitely.  And ideally something that nourishes the brain.  This spinach & strawberry salad with walnuts should fit the bill:

Spinach and Strawberry Salad with Toasted Walnuts and Balsamic Vinaigrette

Spinach and Strawberry Salad with Toasted Walnuts and Balsamic Vinaigrette

 

 

 

 

 

 

Serves 2

Salad:
3 cups baby spinach
1/2 pint fresh strawberries, wash, top removed (hulled) and sliced
1/4 cup walnut pieces or almond slices, lightly toasted

Dressing:
1 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
1/4 tsp. Dijon mustard
2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

Preparation:
In a small bowl, whisk together the balsamic and mustard, slowly whisk the olive oil until well combined; season with salt and freshly ground pepper.  In a large bowl combine the spinach, strawberries and nuts. Pour dressing over salad, toss well to combine. Divide among 2 plates and serve.

Original recipe from here.

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