All posts by Jessica Fonteneau

People Under-Going Genetic Testing To be Accompanied by Trained Professionals

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) supports the call  by Southampton University, Exeter University and Southampton Hospital (published in the BMJ https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l5688) for individuals choosing to undertake genetic testing to be accompanied by trained health professionals.

Personalised healthcare is at the beginning of a genetic revolution with the decoding of the wealth of information that lives within us. Nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and epigenetics are emerging sciences that are already having an enormous impact on all our lives and have a fundamental effect on the way BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners manage their client’s health. Genetic testing can be used to optimise health rather than identifying disease risk.

The University of Southampton publication highlights important shortcomings with Direct-to-Consumer testing and misinterpretation of results with potentially devastating effects and distress. Completing the test with appropriately trained health professional will help to put the results in context.

In 2014 BANT launched its Register of Nutrigenetic Counsellors, following a commitment to the Human Genetics Commission to set up an advanced practice register covering nutrigenetic counselling, following the HGC’s ‘Genes Direct’ reports in 2003 and 2007.

Nutritional therapy and nutrigenomics are linked and BANT Nutrition Practitioners are finding themselves at the cutting edge of scientific knowledge and its application in practice. Genetics and nutrigenomics can be very sensitive subjects and it is vitally important that nutrition practitioners understand the whole picture, what test they should be recommending, how this translates to gene expression and how to explain it to their clients appropriately, safely and legally. Dietary and lifestyle interventions will have more impact on wellbeing than focusing on any gene in isolation. Nature vs. nurture debate continues but, in the meantime, genetic testing can help to optimise the nurture to inform personalised dietary and lifestyle recommendations for optimal wellbeing.

BANT registered nutrition practitioners take into account individuality that enables personalisation of dietary advice based on the most up-to-date research available. They do not suggest ‘one-size-fits-all’ advice following the health trend of the moment. To find a BANT registered nutrition practitioner click here: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces

 

Nutrition Evidence Database – Gluten-Free Diets can Help Reduce Markers in Those with Metabolic Syndrome

Are GLUTEN-FREE diets, for patients without diagnosed gluten-sensitivity, just a fad? A recent trial finds that a gluten-free diet can help reduce waist circumference, blood glucose and triglyceride levels in those with METABOLIC SYNDROME in just 8 weeks.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here https://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/30362336?term=30362336

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – QUALITY of Diet and not the TYPE Diet is Important for Health

Are you confused about what type of diet to follow?  Vegan?  Vegetarian?  Paleo? A new study has found that it is the QUALITY of your diet and not the TYPE of diet that is important to good health across a range of markers.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.

Read it here https://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/31242604?term=31242604

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database Alert – Research Highlights – September 2019 – Preview

NUTRITION EVIDENCE ALERT

SENT IN COLLABORATION WITH NUTRIENTS 

Nutrients MDPI

For this edition of the Nutrition Evidence Alert, we bring you some of the latest science that has hit peer-reviewed journals in the last few weeks. With so much going on in the field of nutrition at the moment, it is tricky to keep on top of new findings, theories and developments. Our pick of articles this month helps you do just that, so you can stay current and use the information to make effective clinical decisions. The selected articles cover topics from the effects of supplemental bacteriophage on gut inflammation to the association between skipping breakfast and being overweight in childhood. Be sure to check out Ben Brown’s article on the complexity of IBS as well as his paper with Deanna Minich on nutritional strategies that influence glutathione status. There are now 81 articles with plain language summaries on the database from 2019 alone.  Have a browse and remember that focused reading of the science and reflection on the learning outcomes that arise from that learning can be logged as CPD.

As an update, there has been a lot of development under the hood in Nutrition Evidence, including the ability to add a range of different record types. Whilst PubMed will continue to be the main source of articles, you will now notice that when you run a search on ‘gut health’ – for example – you will also find some podcasts and e-Learning modules appearing in your search results. We all learn in different ways, so having the ability to access videos or podcasts from credible sources that complement peer reviewed information varies the ways you can keep abreast of the science through Nutrition Evidence.  This new functionality is in its infancy, so watch it grow as we add more content over the coming months. We will of course, continue to focus on the best research quality available, so you can be assured that you are receiving the very best in nutrition evidence.

Happy exploring.

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, Editor-in-Chief 


Featured 2019 Articles

The following 7 articles are featured as “recommended reading” this month:

Nutrition Evidence Database – Improved Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients Who Accompany Chemotherapy and Surgery with Nutritional Interventions

Nutrition Evidence Database – Improved Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients Who Accompany Chemotherapy and Surgery with Nutritional Interventions

A new 2019 systematic review reports improved clinical outcomes for OVARIAN CANCER patients who focus on nutritional interventions during chemotherapy or before operations.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

 

BANT Congratulates David Davis on Reclaiming His Health

David Davis announced this week, through the Daily Mail, that he had lost 25lbs, improved his non-alcoholic fatty liver disease profile and reduced his risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes by following his own version of a lower-carbohydrate diet. The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) congratulates him on joining his friend and colleague Tom Watson, as well as a multitude of other British people, in reclaiming his health.

BANT has been highlighting since the launch of its Wellbeing Guidelines in 2016, the benefits of a lower-carbohydrate diet, particularly in relation to Type 2 Diabetes. Recent scientific studies supporting this approach have also led other health professionals, including Dr David Unwin, into supporting the lower-carbohydrate approach. This is in direct contrast to the current UK guidelines, featured within Public Health England’s (PHE) Eatwell Guide which recommends: “base meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy carbohydrates – choosing wholegrain versions where possible”.

Mr Davis also highlights Professor Dame Sally Davies’, Chief Medical Officer for England, aim to launch a new review into the escalating crisis that is childhood obesity. He mentions that Ultra-Processed Food and Drink may be targeted. BANT published an article on this very topic in July this year: https://bant.org.uk/2019/07/03/bant-cautions-against-dropping-policies-that-support-reduced-consumption-of-ultra-processed-foods/

BANT would like to caution, however, that obesity and diabetes are complex conditions and changes need to be established to engender a long-term cultural shift which allows healthy behaviour adaptations to an environment which offers so many opportunities for unhealthy indulgence either knowingly or in ignorance.  BANT Nutrition Practitioners do not suggest ‘one-size-fits-all’ advice following the health trend of the moment or outdated population-based recommendations but take into account individuality that enables personalisation of dietary advice based on the most up-to-date research available.

BANT is very much aware that much of the advice and information issued regarding the nation’s health and what we should be eating is confusing and often conflicting.  It can be difficult for the public to navigate and interpret the information available, especially in the light of Public Health England’s previous admission that the Eatwell guide is a food selection tool that has been designed to cover the population as a whole, which does not take into account individual health and weight profiles.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

To find a BANT Nutrition Practitioner, please click here:

Registered Nutritional Therapists are on a Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA) Accredited Register, so officially recognised. BANT members are highly skilled, qualified and regulated to work in the field of nutrition in both clinical and non-clinical settings. The PSA is the body charged with safeguarding the public with respect to non-statutorily regulated health professionals.

ENDS

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

 [email protected]Tel: +44 1425 462 532 

NOTES TO EDITORS:

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT)is the professional body for BANT Nutrition Practitioners. Its primary function is to assist its members in attaining the highest standards of integrity, knowledge, competence and professional practice, in both clinical and non-clinical settings.

Registered Nutritional Therapists are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, Registered Nutritional Therapists and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

 

Nutrition Evidence Database – Spice up your Life!

Daily intake of SPICES at culinary levels results in significant positive changes to the composition of the gut bacterial profile, a small, new, high-quality study shows.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here https://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/31242596?term=31242596

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database Alert – Mental Health and Disordered Eating

YOUR NUTRITION EVIDENCE ALERT SENT IN COLLABORATION WITH NUTRIENTS

In January of this year, the NHS launched their long-term plan that attempts to close the gap between physical and mental health. This includes greater financial investment and more comprehensive care that integrates physical and mental health services together into the wider health system.

Nutrition is the cornerstone of an integrated approach to mental health and has a key role in the prevention, development and management of emotional wellbeing. Our diet has a profound impact on neuroendocrine systems, where imbalances are implicated in depression, anxiety and eating disorders.

In this issue of the Nutrition Evidence Alert, we have focused on eating behaviour and mental health, spotlighting over 200 randomised controlled trials that illustrate the key role that diet, nutrition and lifestyle play in the development and management of these conditions. Additionally, our indexing team have produced 70 Plain Language Summaries that focus on the role of nutrition and complementary psychological therapies in mental health and eating disorders.

Happy reading.

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, Editor-in-Chief

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Emma Hendricks is a registered nutritional therapy practitioner and social researcher. She qualified in nutritional therapy from the Institute for Optimum Nutrition, receiving a distinction and the award for best performing student in her year. She has a BSc in Psychology and is currently completing an MSc in Health Psychology. She also has additional qualifications in eating disorders and obesity from the National Centre for Eating Disorder and counselling. Emma’s areas of interest include health behaviour change, disordered eating and emotional wellbeing. She has also worked in social research for various government agencies and charities including Mind and Diabetes UK. 

 

Emma’s editorial picks for you this month are as follows:

Nutrition Evidence Database – Better Musculo-Skeletal Health Associated with Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity in Middle-Aged Women

New analysis shows that MODERATE TO VIGOROUS physical activity in middle-aged women is associated with better MUSCULO-SKELETAL health, when compared to light physical activity.  All BANT registered Nutrition Practitioners will review your exercise programme as part of a routine nutrition consultation.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/27805281?term=27805281

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

Nutrition Evidence Database – Probiotic Strain, Lactobacilluscasei, Reduces Severity and Duration of Diarrhoea Symptoms in Children Under 6

Researchers find that the use of PROBIOTIC STRAIN Lactobacilluscasei (rhamnosus variety) for acute DIARRHOEA in children age 6 months to 6 years, is effective at reducing severity and duration of symptoms.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRTION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/31126062?term=31126062

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the homepage.