All posts by Jessica Fonteneau

Nutrition Evidence – Probiotics Taken When Stressed Can Buffer Cognition Effects

Do you feel that your emotional control and your memory is affected during STRESSFUL periods?  A small study shows that taking a PROBIOTIC supplement during times of stress can help buffer the effects on cognition.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.   Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Vitamin D Supplementation Pregnancy Benefits

A new systematic review on Nutrition Evidence looks at VITAMIN D supplementation and PREGNANCY outcomes.  The findings suggest that Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy can have positive benefits for birth weight, baby length and head circumference.  Whilst study quality was generally low, testing Vitamin D levels in relation to fertility could be considered.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

BANT Welcomes Professor Tim Spector et al., Study, Predict 1

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) welcomes the initial findings from the Predict 1 Study that individualised nutrition and lifestyle recommendations are key to human health. BANT members have been working with their clients offering personalised recommendations for the past 22 years, since BANT’s foundation in 1997, and were proud to have been selected to work with Professor Spector, the lead researcher on this study, on the precursor project to this study, ‘Map My Gut’.

The Predict 1 study confirms the nutrition ethos that BANT has been practising and promoting since its inception. BANT has repeatedly highlighted that a one-size-fits all health and nutrition policy such as Public Health England’s ‘Eat Well Plate’ is counter-productive and that the recent out-dated calorie campaign is inappropriate. Calorie counting takes little to no account of the nutritional values of different foods and their relation to an individuals’ health and the continual tinkering of out-dated nutrition science is putting the health of the British Nation at risk and is contributing to the current National Health Service crisis.

Professor Tim Spector commented “BANT Practitioners know that everyone responds differently to food because they see this in their practices on a day-to-day basis. Members of the public can experiment with this approach by signing up to joinzoe.com to be ahead of the curve when the app is available next year. Your local BANT Practitioner can help you understand your responses better to further personalise your food choices.”

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas, who worked with Professor Spector on Map My Gut said: “the preliminary results of the Predict Study are very encouraging. They support my belief that within 5 years these kind of tools will not be an option, but a necessity for nutrition practitioners to do their job effectively.”

The study was undertaken by an international team comprised of researchers from Kings College, London and Massachusetts General Hospital, alongside nutritional science company, ZOE. 1,000 participants, mostly made up of pairs of twins, consumed set meals and logged every mouthful of food or drink they consumed over a 2-week period. Blood levels of sugar, fat and the hormone insulin were monitored throughout, and data on activities, sleep patterns, hunger and gut bacteria levels were also collected. The main findings were that even amongst the genetically identical twin pairs, blood glucose, fat and hormone responses to identical foods were widely different, confirming the study’s hypothesis that no two people’s responses to individual foods are the same.

BANT Chair Miguel Toribio-Mateas commented: I am excited to see years of scientific data translated into a tangible application that can help change people’s lives. This type of application of nutrition science is the future of clinical practice”

Since 1997 BANT Nutrition Practitioners have practised nutrition and lifestyle medicine, described as the application of behaviour changes to benefit health and prevent disease, based on the knowledge of how diet, nutrition and the environment interact with our genes to promote long-term stability and resilience at cellular level. Nutritional therapy is the application of nutrition science in the promotion of health, peak performance and individual care. It is a progressive approach to health optimisation.

In 2017 the Royal Society for Public Health published a report that looked at the potential impact that the ‘untapped resource’ of practitioners on Accredited Registers (ARs), such as BANT, could make a significant contribution to public health. The report made a key recommendation that AR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. BANT also continues to call for some grass-roots changes to nutrition recommendations including the reintroduction of home economics classes in school; education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term; and promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and the minimisation of ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets.

Looking for a BANT Registered Nutritional Therapist is easy; just click on the link for a full listing of our Registered Nutritional Therapists area by area: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces.

 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Daniel O’Shaughnessy

[email protected]       Tel: +44 870 606 1284

NOTES TO EDITORS:

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT)is the professional body for Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners. Its primary function is to assist its members in attaining the highest standards of integrity, knowledge, competence and professional practice, in order to protect the client’s interests; nutritional therapy and the registered nutrition practitioner.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agencymade a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases. For a full copy of the report, click here: https://www.professionalstandards.org.uk/docs/default-source/publications/untapped-resources—accredited-registers-in-the-wider-workforce-november-2017.pdf?sfvrsn=0)

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here:

Nutrition Evidence – Gluten Sensitivity Association with Co-ordination, Balance and Speech Difficulties

A review finds an association between difficulties with coordination, balance and speech and/or peripheral nerve damage of unknown origin and gluten sensitivity.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Paper – Highest Total Fibre Relates to Reduced Ovarian Cancer Risk

More reasons to eat your VEGETABLES!  A paper summarising the findings of 13 studies concludes that women with the highest TOTAL FIBRE intake have a 22% reduced risk of developing OVARIAN cancer compared to those with the lowest fibre intake.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/search?term=30376840&search=search

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Eating Alone Reduces Diet Quality Versus Eating in Company

Invite your friends over for dinner!  A study shows that eating alone significantly reduces diet quality compared to eating in company.  It is not just about making the right food choices, but setting up the right environment as well.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Mediterranean Style Diet Associated with Improved Physical Performance in the Elderly with Type 2 Diabetes

Eating a Mediterranean style diet is associated with improved physical performance in elderly patients with Type 2 diabetes, a new study shows.

This paper has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/29899221?term=29899221.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Variety Important to Encourage Vegetable Consumption in Pre-School Children

VARIETY is important to encourage VEGETABLE consumption in pre-school children, a new study shows.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.   Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/30513873?term=30513873.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

Nutrition Evidence Database Alert – Dietary Diversity and Health Outcomes in Collaboration with the Journal ‘Nutrients’

NUTRITION EVIDENCE ALERT

SENT IN COLLABORATION WITH NUTRIENTS 

Nutrients MDPI

“Variety’s the very spice of life, that gives it all its flavour” said English poet William Cowper in 1785. Fast-forward 234 years and, although in a different context, that quote is still as current as is relevant.

For this edition of the Nutrition Evidence Alert, we have focused on the benefits of dietary diversity, highlighting 53 randomised controlled trials that illustrate how the popular concept of “eating the rainbow” has positive ramifications on human health. Our indexing team has also worked hard on 36 plain language summaries on this very subject which we hope you will find useful.

In addition to sharing our work on this exciting subject,  this month I am delighted to announce that we have partnered with the prestigious journal Nutrients for this alert. My thanks to Nutrients’ Managing Editor Leo Jiang at MDPI for facilitating this collaboration, which we are celebrating with specially curated editorial picks by acclaimed scientist and author Dr Deanna Minich on her favourite subject: dietary diversity and health outcomes. Deanna has just become an Editorial Board  member at Nutrition Evidence, so I would like you to join me in welcoming her to the team.

Last, but not least, we have negotiated an outstanding deal for you to attend Dr Datis Kharrazian’s course on clinical strategies for the management of neuroinflammation, which been approved by BANT for a substantial 13 hours of CPD. You’ll find full here:

Get a lot more out of Nutrition Evidence

How? Register to open a free account now. It takes 30 seconds and it will give you access to exclusive features available to registered users only: http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/

Meet The Editor: Dr Deanna Minich 

“Hello! I’m Deanna. I’m a researcher / clinician and educator in nutrition and lifestyle medicine. I have published several books  where I’ve focused on translating complex science about health properties of colours in foods into plain English so that everyone can benefit from “full spectrum health.” 

Dr. Deanna Minich is a clinician / researcher with a unique approach to healthcare that pays as much attention to the person’s emotional state as it does to physiological changes. She has an academic background in nutritional science, including a Master’s Degree in Human Nutrition and Dietetics from the University of Illinois at Chicago (1995), and a Ph.D. in Medical Sciences (Dissertation: Essential Fatty Acid Absorption and Metabolism) from the University of Groningen in The Netherlands (1999).

In conjunction with her academic degrees and extensive teaching experience at university level, Dr Minich has served on the Institute of Functional Medicine’s Nutrition Advisory Board and curriculum committee, and has worked along Dr Jeffrey Bland at the Personalized Lifestyle Medicine Institute. She is both a Fellow (F.A.C.N.), a Certified Nutrition Specialist (C.N.S.) through the American College of Nutrition and has over fifteen years of experience working in the food and dietary supplement industries. In addition, Deanna spends her time as a Board member for the American College of Nutrition and as adjunct faculty at the University of Western States. She is the author of six books on nutrition, wellness, and psychology, and is passionate in helping others to live well using therapeutic lifestyle changes.

These are Dr Minich’s editorial picks on dietary diversity and health:

Featured Expert Reviews:

The following 2 expert reviews are featured as “recommended reading” this month:

Happy reading.

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, Editor-in-Chief 

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Paper – Spices and Heart Health

Can consuming SPICES have an impact on your heart health? Authors of a review study conclude that CINNAMON consumption showed blood pressure lowering effects in patients with Type 2 diabetes and suggest that spice consumption in general should be encouraged.  Time to make a curry!

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.