All posts by Jessica Fonteneau

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Food Allergies in the Elderly

FOOD ALLERGIES are becoming more common in the ELDERLY.  This article discusses a number of underlying mechanisms for this observation.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

 

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Cinnamon and Metabolic Syndrome

This clinical trial found that 3g of CINNAMON for 16 weeks improved blood glucose control, body composition, body mass index, lipid profile and blood pressure in Asian Indian individuals with METABOLIC SYNDROME.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

BANT Baffled by Contrary Government Initiatives: The ‘Better Health’ Campaign Versus ‘Eat Out to Help Out’ Scheme

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) was pleased to announce its support for the recently announced Governmental obesity campaign, ‘Better Health’. The launch of the Government’s ‘Eat Out to Help Out’ with inclusion of ultra-processed food and drink offerings such as McDonald’s is, however, completely baffling and goes against any progress towards the Government’s aim to ease the burden on our over-stretched NHS.

BANT absolutely supports initiatives that boost the economy and thus protect employment, however, including restaurants that serve ultra-processed food and drinks which are at the very heart of the obesogenic environment and which target low-income families, is absolute madness.  Stealing from our health to pay our food industry is a knee-jerk solution.  Supporting the nation’s farmers and offering monetary incentives to purchase minimally processed foods like non-starchy vegetables, fruit and healthy protein, which are more satiating and elicit less of a glycaemic response than ultra-processed foods, would have resulted in both campaigns being successful.

Whilst the reasons behind obesity are multifactorial, research is very clear that the addictive nature of ultra-processed foods and drinks, socio-economic factors and the ease of availability of these foods within the local environment, play a very large part in the obesity epidemic today. BANT published an article ‘Nutrition in the Age of Convenience’ in 2019 highlighting how the prevalence of highly addictive ultra-processed foods and drinks have massively impacted the nation’s health.

BANT was launched in 1997 to meet the needs of practitioners who were looking to practice a different approach to nutrition, one that was based on personalising evidence-based recommendations to the individual. BANT has, since its foundation, continuously called out for a different approach to the obesity crisis and has suggested: education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term; and promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and of foods and ingredients that are not ultra-processed.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times, and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the obesity targets and health of the individuals.

 

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Plant Compounds for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

This clinical trial showed that FERULIC ACID, an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compound found in many plant foods, can improve several CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS within just six weeks in people with elevated blood lipids.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here https://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/29865227?term=29865227

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  Click on Subscribe on the database homepage to subscribe for the next alert.

 

BANT Supports the ‘Better Health’ Campaign but Cautions Against the ‘One-Size-Fits-All’ Approach

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) whole-heartedly supports any Governmental focus on improving the health of the British nation, a goal that BANT has, itself, been campaigning for over the past 20 years.

The ‘Better Health’ campaign with its U-turn on policy relating to junk food advertising and its goals to restrict BOGOF (Buy One, Get One Free) deals relating to foods that are ultra-processed, high in salt, fat and sugar and their availability at check-outs, is the first step in the right direction. It will set the background for establishing the changes needed to engender a long-term cultural shift which allows healthy behaviour adaptations to an environment that offers so many opportunities for unhealthy indulgence either knowingly or in ignorance.

BANT is, however, against the use of calorie counting as it is well established that calorie counting is difficult to manage in supporting people looking to lower their risk of obesity. Calorie counting takes little to no account of the nutritional values of different foods and their relation to health and is problematic for those at risk of eating disorders. Not for the first time BANT is asking “why promote a campaign that leads the population to rely on calorie defined processed foods, rather than simple, wholesome ingredients?”. BANT is looking forward to the outcome of work done on traffic light labelling system. The current system has some shortcomings, for example, in that a red label can be assigned to a healthy food e.g. an avocado, making it confusing to the public.

The causes of obesity are multifactorial and can include increased stress levels, systemic low-grade inflammation, lack of exercise, and choice of foods and their preparation/cooking methods, amongst others. There is growing evidence that minimally processed foods like non-starchy vegetables, fruit and healthy protein are more satiating and elicit less of a glycaemic response than ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets. Additionally, minimally processed foods are associated with a decreased risk of cardio-metabolic disease. BANT published an article ‘Nutrition in the Age of Convenience’ in 2019 highlighting how the prevalence of highly addictive ultra-processed foods and drinks have massively impacted the nation’s health. (A fully referenced, academic paper on this topic is available on request).

BANT continuously cautions that population-wide recommendations highlighted in Eatwell Guide that is not only based on out-dated nutrition science but is also aimed at a ‘healthy population’ is inappropriate. It is not only putting the health of the British public at risk but is contributing to the current National Health Service crisis. The OECD 2019 obesity rankings classified the UK as the eleventh most obese nation in the world, which whilst an improvement is still a truly dubious honour. Obesity and its related conditions are complex issues which require interventions at multiple levels to achieve both effective prevention and successful treatment, and this is putting an unbearable and unwarranted burden on NHS. A burden that the NHS at this time can ill-afford.

BANT was launched in 1997 to meet the needs of practitioners who were looking to practice a different approach to nutrition, one that was based on personalising evidence-based recommendations to the individual. BANT has, since its foundation, continuously called out for a different approach to the obesity crisis and has suggested: education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term; and promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and of foods and ingredients that are not ultra-processed.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times, and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the obesity targets and health of the individuals.

  • Ends –

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

[email protected]        Tel: +44 870 606 1284

 

NOTES TO EDITORS:

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) is the professional body for Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners. Its primary function is to assist its members in attaining the highest standards of integrity, knowledge, competence and professional practice, in order to protect the client’s interests; nutritional therapy and the registered nutrition practitioner.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here:

 

 

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Probiotics for Childhood Gastroenteritis

This meta-analysis showed that a specific PROBIOTIC strain, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM17938, can shorten duration of illness and hospitalisation for acute GASTROENTERITIS in young children.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Anthocyanins to Reduce Inflammation

This systematic review and meta-analysis found that ANTHOCYANINS, the colourful pigments in plant foods, may reduce INFLAMMATORY MARKERS, with higher doses being more effective.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

 

Nutrition Evidence Database Enhanced Study – Coeliac Disease, Gut Bacteria and Probiotics

People with COELIAC DISEASE show specific patterns in gut bacteria which can be modulated by PROBIOTICS.  A review of the evidence.

This study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly, so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

 

BANT Raises Concerns about Highly Selective Criteria in Draft SACN Report ‘Lower carbohydrate diets for adults with type 2 diabetes’

The country may be focused on the COVID-19 pandemic but as BANT members know, another epidemic of growing proportions is afflicting the nation, Type 2 Diabetes (TD2).  BANT was initially delighted to be informed that SACN was reviewing its recommendations in relation to lower carbohydrate diets for adults with TD2, but this turned to dismay when the draft report was published for consultation and it became apparent that highly selective criteria had been used, giving rise to a potential misrepresentation of  the outcomes.

Some of the key points in BANTs response to SACN published consultation included the fact that body weight, which is neither a symptom or a marker for T2D, was set as a primary outcome, skewing the analysis and potentially ignoring evidence for recommendations for a significant subset of the population with T2D who are not overweight e.g. some BAME populations.

Secondary outcomes such as blood pressure were omitted from evidence, but should be included, given the report defines reduction of blood pressure as a measure of dietary intervention success.

Additionally, as stated by SACN in their report, their framework was not established for making recommendations on clinical conditions. In this context, BANT considers that the framework should be amended to allow evidence from clinical practice, so far excluded, to ensure recommendations which enable clinicians to provide a patient-centred standard of care which is logical and reasonable.

Whilst the on-going Sars-CoV-2 pandemic has raised the profile of the general metabolic health of the nation and the increased risk to BAME populations, the reality is that these fundamental health disparities have existed for decades and BANT has been campaigning on this issue since its foundation in 1997.

 

BANT Welcomes Boris’ ‘Damascene’ Moment Leading to a Focus on Obesity and Fitness

BANT has campaigned long and hard for the Government and policy makers to put improving the nation’s health at the centre of their health manifesto and welcomes the Prime Minister’s acknowledgement that his own recent health crisis has made him aware that a libertarian approach to the epidemic that is both obesity and  metabolic conditions, is not only risking the lives of many of the most at risk communities, but adding to the burden placed on our precious NHS.

BANT, since its foundation in 1997, has continuously called out for a different approach to the obesity crisis and has suggested: education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term; and promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and of foods and ingredients that are not ultra-processed.

Mr Johnson’s U-turn is the first step in the right direction and will set the background for establishing the changes needed to engender a long-term cultural shift which allows healthy behaviour adaptations to an environment that offers so many opportunities for unhealthy indulgence either knowingly or in ignorance. Evidence-based research is unanimous in its findings that the ultra-processed food and drink category is bad for human health. Healthcare policy that acknowledges this would be a good second step. The question we should be asking on behalf of lower income families is: why are many healthier food choices expensive and convenience food so cheap?

The causes of obesity are multifactorial and can include increased stress levels, systemic low-grade inflammation, lack of exercise, and choice of foods and their preparation/cooking methods, amongst others. There is growing evidence that minimally processed foods like non-starchy vegetables and fruit are more satiating and elicit less of a glycaemic response than ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets. Additionally, minimally processed foods are associated with a decreased risk of cardio-metabolic disease.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times, and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the obesity targets and health of the individuals.