All posts by Claire Sambolino

BANT recommends ‘extraordinary measure’ of Vitamin C and Vitamin D supplementation

BANT recommends ‘extraordinary measure’ of Vitamin C and Vitamin D supplementation for all adults as part of a wider prevention strategy for COVID-19.

With the apparent second wave of COVID-19 worsening, BANT recommends all adults supplement 1000mg of Vitamin C and a minimum of 600-800 IU/d vitamin D3 daily, increasing to a higher therapeutic dose of 5000 IU/d should symptoms develop (1). An adequate intake of Vitamins C and D is vital for immune resilience. Food sources of both are imperative for maintenance but unlikely to provide adequate quantities in case of infection. Supplementation of both nutrients at the given levels is safe, effective, and an inexpensive way to encourage individuals to take preventative measures to support their immune system. Vitamin D insufficiency is especially common in northern hemisphere countries where limited exposure to sunlight reduces our ability to naturally synthesise it through skin. For this reason, Public Health England recommend 10 micrograms of Vitamin D daily throughout the winter months.

Vitamin D is a potent immune modifying micronutrient and deficiency has been shown to correspond to a greater risk of respiratory tract infections, and acute respiratory distress in SARS-CoV-2 infections (1). A recent large meta-analysis (looking at 10,933 people in 25 trials), showed that vitamin D supplementation reduced the risk of cold and flu patients developing acute respiratory infections (ARIs) from 60% to 32% (2). Similarly, hospital data on early intervention with Vitamin D supplementation in SARS-CoV-2 infections reduced severity of the infection and lowered ICU admissions (3). The most abundant food sources of Vitamin D are oily fish, mushrooms and egg yolks. Three foods which are often absent in the nation’s regular dietary intake, and which alone cannot provide adequate levels, reinforcing the possible need for supplementation. In some individuals, testing and supplementation via their general practitioner may be best advised.

Evidence on Vitamin C is equally compelling. A potent antioxidant, Vitamin C plays an immuno-protective role to protect against oxidative damage to the cells, helping moderate inflammatory cytokines and reduce both the severity and longevity of infection (4). Whilst Vitamin C is readily available in foods such as citrus fruits and leafy greens, low storage capacity means a regular intake of it is necessary for adequate plasma levels.

BANT urges the government to make clear recommendations as part of a wider prevention strategy for COVID-19 to empower individuals to make informed decisions about their food choices and need for additional supplementation.

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Visit our Politics Home portal for the latest press releases from BANT.

https://www.politicshome.com/members/article/bant-recommends-extraordinary-vitamin-c-and-vitamin-d-supplementation-for-all-adults-as-part-of-a-wider-prevention-strategy-for-covid19

Excluding nutrition from mainstream healthcare has contributed to the catastrophic impact of SARS-CoV-2.

 

For too long nutrition has been dismissed by mainstream healthcare, despite clear evidence that diet and lifestyle choices either contribute to health or increased risk factors for chronic disease. The rising obesity epidemic is proof alone that a more decisive tactic is needed to combat the discord between public health and personalised lifestyle medicine, of which nutrition plays an integral part. As we enter the next wave of COVID-19 restrictions, is it now the time to consider the role nutrition can play in preventative healthcare?

“Long-term failure to provide adequate nutritional guidance to the public and a reliance on generic advice from Public Health England to pick up the shortfall, has undoubtedly contributed to the catastrophic impact of SARS-CoV-2”

notes BANT CEO Satu Jackson. BANT Nutrition Practitioners offer personalised nutritional guidance to individuals and rigorously recommend testing for nutrient deficiencies as part of a preventative strategy for chronic disease. The results of the government’s one-size-fits-all approach to healthcare is evident with obesity levels and metabolic dysregulation continuing to rise exponentially (1) and worsening health of the public now contributing to COVID-19 outcomes.

The emergence of data pointing to nutritional deficiencies in SARS-CoV-2 patients (2) highlights the need for a more unified approach. BANT recommends Vitamin C and D supplementation be considered as part of a preventative strategy for COVID-19 (2) where food sources are unable to adequately support the individual. BANT calls on the government to consider the nutritional status of the public as part of the current pandemic, and to engage with BANT to work towards building a more inclusive and effective healthcare model.

 

  • https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/statistics-on-obesity-physical-activity-and-diet-england-2020-ns
  • Serum levels of vitamin C and vitamin D in a cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients of a north American community hospital intensive care unit in may 2020. A pilot study https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32964205/
  • Evidence that Vitamin D Supplementation Could Reduce Risk of Influenza and COVID-19 Infections and Deaths, 2020, https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/4/988

 

Visit our Politics Home portal for the latest press releases from BANT.

https://www.politicshome.com/members/article/excluding-nutrition-from-mainstream-healthcare-has-contributed-to-the-catastrophic-impact-of-sarscov2

Compelling Evidence on Vitamin D status & severity of COVID-19 symptoms

Compelling Evidence on Vitamin D status and severity of COVID-19 symptoms prompt MP David Davis to speak out

 

“A cheap way of tackling COVID-19 is being ignored”

warns British MP and former cabinet minister David Davis in the face of mounting evidence that Vitamin D status reduces COVID-19 severity. BANT agrees that in the absence of an effective anti-viral therapy for COVID-19, a Vitamin D supplement regime should be extended to the general population, as a preventive measure to help mitigate the grave public health risks associated with COVID-19 infection.

Vitamin D insufficiency is common in northern countries throughout the winter months, with limited daylight hours and sun exposure. Whilst BANT recommends firstly sourcing nutrients through food, there are few natural foods containing adequate Vitamin D. This has been greatly aided by an increase in fortified foods, particularly in the dairy and cereal categories, however, they do not necessarily provide adequate therapeutic doses to support the immune system against infection. The evidence on the immune modulating effects of Vitamin D is nothing new. BANT Nutrition Practitioners often include Vitamin D testing, and where appropriate, supplementation in clinical practice. Public Health England recommend a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms Vitamin D during autumn and winter months (1).  Supplementation should be considered as part of a wider therapeutic protocol to optimise immune resilience and lower the risk factors associated with poor Vitamin D status in individuals.

Whilst Vitamin D is not a silver bullet, BANT warns that ignoring Vitamin D status is risking the outcomes of those most susceptible to COVID-19 infection. Optimising Vitamin D status can only be beneficial, especially to people who fall into this at-risk group. To this end, BANT urges the government to take decisive action and issue clearer guidance to the public.

 

 

Visit our Politics Home portal for the latest press releases from BANT.

Compelling Evidence on Vitamin D status and severity of Covid-19 symptoms prompts MP David Davis to speak out

 

 

Nutrition Evidence Alert – September 2020

As the mornings get cooler and the news is full of predictions of a second wave of Coronavirus, many Nutrition Practitioners are wondering what role the nutrition profession will play in supporting recovery from this health crisis. Nutrition Evidence is here to bring you the latest science available to inform your clinical decisions in this area, so you can feel confident in your practice.

It is now clear that those with certain co-morbidities are more susceptible to serious complications from infection with Covid-19.  Many of the conditions identified fall under the umbrella of Metabolic Syndrome.

This month, we begin a series of alerts focusing on Metabolic Syndrome.  Over the next few months, we will be bringing the latest scientific research to your inbox on the different biochemical processes that have gone wrong and lead to metabolic disorder. To begin your dive into this vast subject, check out this short list of recent systematic reviews, before diving through the 26 randomised controlled trials released within the last 10 years.

Happy exploring.

 

Newly Indexed Articles for September 2020

The following articles are featured as “recommended reading” this month:

New Insights about How to Make an Intervention in Children and Adolescents with Metabolic Syndrome: Diet, Exercise vs. Changes in Body Composition. A Systematic Review of RCT. in Nutrients, 2018

Paleolithic nutrition for metabolic syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis. in The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2015

The Effect of a Multidisciplinary Lifestyle Intervention on Obesity Status, Body Composition, Physical Fitness, and Cardiometabolic Risk Markers in Children and Adolescents with Obesity. in Nutrients, 2019

Effect of a Nutritional and Behavioral Intervention on Energy-Reduced Mediterranean Diet Adherence Among Patients With Metabolic Syndrome: Interim Analysis of the PREDIMED-Plus Randomized Clinical Trial. in JAMA, 2019

Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Obesity-Induced Insulin Resistance: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial. in Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 2018

Comparison of low calorie high protein and low calorie standard protein diet on waist circumference of adults with visceral obesity and weight cycling. in BMC research notes, 2018

Non-Nutritive Sweeteners and Their Implications on the Development of Metabolic Syndrome. in Nutrients, 2019

The Fluid Aspect of the Mediterranean Diet in the Prevention and Management of Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes: The Role of Polyphenol Content in Moderate Consumption of Wine and Olive Oil. in Nutrients, 2019

 

BANT Calls for Removal of Ultra-Processed Foods from School Meals to Combat Poverty Related Malnutrition

Today in Parliament, the possibility of free school meals is going back on the Parliamentary agenda thanks to Lord Bassam. Whilst the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) supports the idea that children who live in poverty should be helped and nourished, the organisation notes a sound of warning that the infiltration of ultra-processed, industrial foods into school canteens, is actively harming the health of the next generation and costing the British economy billions. 

Complaints about school food have always existed and the memory of paper-thin slices of roast, usually identifiable by the sauce that accompanied it, served with two vegetables, followed by a starchy pudding and custard, is not that far behind. The nutritious offering of this meal was, however, far and beyond more complete than the foods being served in school canteens up and down the country today.  

Changing school food in isolation is difficult, children and parents resist the change, particularly with the pressures of advertising, fast food outlets and even industrial food giants offering free school materials, that our children are constantly exposed to. The time, however, is right. With climate change, health and nutrition so intertwined and children leading the charge on these topics, there is a real opportunity to galvanise a whole generation to improve their health, whilst saving the planet.  Government policy urgently needs to support this ground-swell and to resist the constant industrial pressures that serve the interests of profits over health and wellbeing. 

BANT also continues to call for the reintroduction of Home Economics classes. Teaching school children simple, cost-effective dishes that they can cook at home will give them the tools of a lifetime to combat poverty related malnutrition. For the future health of the children, the country and the planet, the most important thing for us to do now is to turn our backs on industrial pressure and ultra-processed foods.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Daniel O’Shaughnessy

[email protected]        Tel: +44 870 606 1284

NOTES TO EDITORS:

The British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT)is the professional body for Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners. Its primary function is to assist its members in attaining the highest standards of integrity, knowledge, competence and professional practice, in order to protect the client’s interests; nutritional therapy and the registered nutrition practitioner.  

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases. 

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here:

Nutrition Evidence Database – Low Calorie Keto Diet for Obese Patients

Researchers conclude that a very low calorie KETOGENIC diet is a suitable and valuable treatment option for obese patients, improving food and alcohol cravings, exercise levels, sleep quality, sexual function and quality of life.

This trial has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science. Read it here:

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science?  The next alert is due out soon so sign up quickly so you don’t miss out! Click on Subscribe on the database homepage.

Nutrition Evidence : Protein Levels, Weight Loss and Waist Circumference


How much protein should you eat as part of a weight loss strategy? A small scientific study finds that the PROTEIN levels in a dietary weight loss plan did NOT affect WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE.  Study authors call for INDIVIDULAISED macronutrient intakes for successful weight loss.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here

 NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

Nutrition Evidence Database – Protein Portions as Part of Weight-Loss Strategy

How much protein should you eat as part of a weight loss strategy? A small scientific study finds that the PROTEIN levels in a dietary weight loss plan did NOT affect WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE.  Study authors call for INDIVIDUALISED macronutrient intakes for successful weight loss.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.    Read it here http://www.nutrition-evidence.com/article/30241565?term=30241565&limit=expert_opinion:Plain%20Language%20Summary 

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.  If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.

 

Nutrition Evidence Database Alert – Nutrition and Neurodevelopment

Did you know that you can get a lot more out of Nutrition Evidence?

Really? How? By registering your details and opening a free account. It literally takes 30 seconds and it will give you access to some great upcoming features. Register here

Nutrition plays a crucial role in linking developmental neurobiology and cognitive neuroscience. It has a profound impact on the development of brain structure and function, with nutrition imbalances potentially resulting in developmental dysfunction and disease in later life. Additionally, emerging science is starting to document how the way we feed our gut microbes also has an indisputable effect on brain health.

In this issue of the Nutrition Evidence Alert you will find 95 Plain Language Summaries – including 50 randomised controlled trials – focusing on the role of nutrition in brain health. The aim of this issue is to help you achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the processes involved in neurobehavioral and neurodegenerative disorders. Our indexing team was particularly interested in how individualised nutritional strategies might help prevent these conditions, as well as how gut microbial balance might contribute to improved quality of life.

 

Access Plain Language Summaries on Nutrition and Neurobehavioural / Neurodevelopmental Health >

 

 

Meet The Editor: Dr Kate Lawrence

“Hello! I’m Kate, a psychology lecturer and researcher into emotional and social development with a special interest in how the microbiome influences mental health and well-being.”   

After Kate gained her BA (Hons) First Class in Psychology at Oxford University in 1997 she was involved in research work at Great Ormond Street Hospital and the Institute of Child Health. She was awarded a PhD in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at UCL in 2003 with a focus on social and emotional skills in individuals with Autistic Spectrum Disorders, Turner syndrome, and typically developing children, adolescents and adults. Since then Kate has been involved in a range of national and international multidisciplinary collaborative projects incorporating psychology, genetics and neuroscience.

From 2013 Kate has been working on the psychology programme at St Mary’s University Twickenham where she has been publishing interesting discoveries about the influence of age, gender and puberty on emotional development, together with collaborators at UCL.

At present Kate is currently working on a project with nutritional therapist Jeannette Hyde, looking at the influence of dietary microbiome manipulations on physical and emotional wellbeing.

Kate’s editorial picks for you this month are as follows:

Dietary Considerations in Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Potential Role of Protein Digestion and Microbial Putrefaction in the Gut-Brain Axis >

Microbiome-Gut-Brain Axis and Toll-Like Receptors in Parkinson’s Disease >

Gut microbiota, cognitive frailty and dementia in older individuals: a systematic review >

Microbiota Transfer Therapy alters gut ecosystem and improves gastrointestinal and autism symptoms: an open-label study >

 

Nutrition Evidence – Do Nutrition Labels Influence Healthier Food Purchases?

Do NUTRITION LABELS influence HEALTHIER FOOD purchases?  A new analysis of food label viewing behaviour shows that consumers look at around 1/5 of purchased products labels, focusing mainly on convenience foods, breads and oils.

The study has been BANT enhanced on the NUTRITION EVIDENCE database to provide a full plain language summary to allow quick and easy access to the science.  Read it here.

NUTRITION EVIDENCE is open access and FREE so please have a browse through some other content whilst you are there http://www.nutrition-evidence.com.

If you like what you see, why not register as a user of Nutrition Evidence and receive monthly expert-generated alerts on the latest findings in nutrition science? Click on Subscribe on the homepage.