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Nutrition Evidence Database Alert – Mental Health and Disordered Eating

YOUR NUTRITION EVIDENCE ALERT SENT IN COLLABORATION WITH NUTRIENTS

In January of this year, the NHS launched their long-term plan that attempts to close the gap between physical and mental health. This includes greater financial investment and more comprehensive care that integrates physical and mental health services together into the wider health system.

Nutrition is the cornerstone of an integrated approach to mental health and has a key role in the prevention, development and management of emotional wellbeing. Our diet has a profound impact on neuroendocrine systems, where imbalances are implicated in depression, anxiety and eating disorders.

In this issue of the Nutrition Evidence Alert, we have focused on eating behaviour and mental health, spotlighting over 200 randomised controlled trials that illustrate the key role that diet, nutrition and lifestyle play in the development and management of these conditions. Additionally, our indexing team have produced 70 Plain Language Summaries that focus on the role of nutrition and complementary psychological therapies in mental health and eating disorders.

Happy reading.

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, Editor-in-Chief

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Emma Hendricks is a registered nutritional therapy practitioner and social researcher. She qualified in nutritional therapy from the Institute for Optimum Nutrition, receiving a distinction and the award for best performing student in her year. She has a BSc in Psychology and is currently completing an MSc in Health Psychology. She also has additional qualifications in eating disorders and obesity from the National Centre for Eating Disorder and counselling. Emma’s areas of interest include health behaviour change, disordered eating and emotional wellbeing. She has also worked in social research for various government agencies and charities including Mind and Diabetes UK. 

 

Emma’s editorial picks for you this month are as follows: