All posts by Jessica Fonteneau

BANT Supports Urgent Action on Childhood Obesity

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) would like to offer their support to the government in tackling childhood obesity. The Local Government Association analysed Public Health England figures and found 1 in 25 children are classed as severely obese (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-obesity-and-excess-weight-small-area-level-data).

Whilst there are initiatives by the government to tackle childhood obesity are in place, such as the sugar tax on sugary soft drinks (http://bant.org.uk/bant/pdf/pressReleases/Sugar_Tax_Press_Release_March_2016.pdf), more can be done such as banning junk food adverts and educating children in primary school of the importance of a healthy diet. Our children are growing up bombarded with advertisements promoting poor food choices. Home economics classes, once a permanent feature on a school time table, have disappeared. Lack of education will simply turn the obese children of today into the obese adults of tomorrow which in turn will create health problems and put more strain on the NHS.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:
Whilst the core curriculum does include diet and lifestyle teaching, this is based on the inherently flawed Eatwell Guide and major food brands often provide the education materials to support these modules. Having education based on the BANT Wellbeing Guidelines will encourage the consumption of healthy ingredients and unprocessed foods, disassociating commercial interests.
Since its inception in 1997, BANT has repeatedly called for a change in the UK’s national obesity strategy, including participating in the Commons Health Select Committee’s Childhood Obesity Inquiry.  British children are suffering the brunt of this health crisis and things cannot continue in the same way.

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here

European Obesity Day – BANT Continues to Campaign to Prevent Childhood Obesity

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) is saddened that the obesity epidemic has grown to such proportions that today (18th May), has been designated as the European Obesity Day. The organisation and its 2,500 nutrition practitioner members have continually called for the UK’s healthy eating strategy to be modified so that it reflects today’s scientific evidence and not the objectives of business and politics.

Since its inception in 1997, BANT has repeatedly called for a change in the UK’s national obesity strategy, including participating in the Commons Health Select Committee’s Childhood Obesity Inquiry.  British children are suffering the brunt of this health crisis and things cannot continue in the same way.

Our children are growing up bombarded with advertisements promoting poor food choices. Home economics classes, once a permanent feature on a school time table, have disappeared. Many British children, often from the most vulnerable backgrounds, are growing up unable to recognise different fruit and vegetables, fundamental for good health. Whilst the core curriculum does include diet and lifestyle teaching, this is based on the inherently flawed Eatwell Guide and major food brands often provide the education materials to support these modules. BANT continues its clarion call for Government Agencies to promote the consumption of healthy ingredients and unprocessed foods, disassociating commercial interests. Earlier this month BANT lent its support to Jamie Oliver’s Childhood Obesity Manifesto and applauds all of the work he is currently undertaking.

The causes of obesity are multifactorial and can include increased stress levels, systemic low-grade inflammation, lack of exercise, and choice of foods and their preparation/cooking methods, amongst others.  There is growing evidence that minimally processed foods like non-starchy vegetables and fruit are more satiating and elicit less of a glycaemic response than ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets. Additionally, minimally processed foods are associated with a decreased risk of cardio-metabolic disease.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the obesity targets and health of the individuals.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding outdated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here

BANT Fully Supports Jamie Oliver’s Childhood Obesity Manifesto

BANT (British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine) fully supports Jamie Oliver’s Childhood Obesity Manifesto. BANT has long called for a different approach to the obesity crisis and indeed it reflects what was called for by the House of Commons Health Select Committee in their Childhood Obesity inquiry.  BANT admires Jamie Oliver’s tenacity as a parent, celebrity chef, restauranteur and healthy eating ambassador, in campaigning for the greater good: the fundamental right of good health for British children.

Earlier this year, BANT highlighted its delight on hearing the news that the Government is planning to ban junk food advertising and two for one promotions. Jamie Oliver’s Manifesto, is a one of common sense and it is time that British lawmakers and their advisors recognised that the nutrition policies of the last several decades are not working and that a radical new approach needs to be embraced. One that sticks to the scientific evidence and the health needs of our nation, over the objectives of business and politics.

In addition to Jamie Oliver’s points, BANT would like to suggest:

  • The reintroduction of home economics classes in school
  • Education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term, but not based on the inherently flawed Eatwell Guide.
  • Promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and unprocessed food.

Jamie Oliver’s Manifesto and BANT’s similar repeated calls would set the background for establishing the changes needed to engender a long-term cultural and environmental shift. We need to move away from the current state which actively promotesunhealthy indulgence, either knowingly or in ignorance.

The causes of obesity are multifactorial and can include increased stress levels, systemic low-grade inflammation, lack of exercise, and choice of foods and their preparation/cooking methods, amongst others.  There is growing evidence that minimally processed foods like non-starchy vegetables and fruit are more satiating and elicit less of a glycaemic response than ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets. Additionally, minimally processed foods are associated with a decreased risk of cardio-metabolic disease.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times, and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the obesity targets and health of the individuals.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding out-dated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice is for weight management and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AVR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces

BANT Delighted by the News that Government is Considering a U-Turn on a Junk Food Advertising Ban and Two For One Promotions

BANT (British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy) is delighted by the news that the Government is planning a u-turn in policy relating to banning junk food advertising and two for one promotions.

Just yesterday BANT called out for a different approach to the obesity crisis following the baffling decision by Public Health England to launch a campaign focusing on the outdated nutrition science of calorie counting, coupled with quotes from senior PHE members highlighting how processed food offerings can be selected to fall within the calorie limits and with no mention of simple, wholesome ingredients and home cooked fare.

Contrary to PHE, BANT suggests: the reintroduction of home economics classes in school; education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term; and promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and unprocessed food.  This policy u-turn is the first step in the right direction and will set the background for establishing the changes needed to engender a long-term cultural shift which allows healthy behaviour adaptations to an environment that offers so many opportunities for unhealthy indulgence either knowingly or in ignorance.

The causes of obesity are multifactorial and can include increased stress levels, systemic low-grade inflammation, lack of exercise, and choice of foods and their preparation/cooking methods, amongst others.  There is growing evidence that minimally processed foods like non-starchy vegetables and fruit are more satiating and elicit less of a glycaemic response than ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets. Additionally, minimally processed foods are associated with a decreased risk of cardio-metabolic disease.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food. Going back to some old-fashioned values, such a family meal times, and improving the nations cooking skills to use fresh ingredients, will go a long way to help the obesity targets and health of the individuals.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding out-dated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice for is to address weight loss and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces

BANT Baffled by Public Health England’s Campaign Focusing on Calories

BANT (British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy) is baffled by Public Health England’s new ‘One You’ campaign focusing on the scientifically old-fashioned notion of calories.

It is well established that calorie counting is difficult to manage in supporting people looking to lower their risk of obesity. Calorie counting takes little to no account of the nutritional values of different foods and their relation to health and is problematic for those at risk of eating disorders. Not for the first time BANT is asking “why promote a campaign that leads the population to rely on calorie defined processed foods, rather than simple, wholesome ingredients?”.

Humans don’t think in calories and the risk is that PHE is encouraging the very people who may need to modify their eating habits, to rely on processed offerings, due to calorie figures being highlighted on packets.  The question that needs to be answered is why PHE doesn’t promote wholefood and individual ingredients, when evidence-based nutrition science continuously highlights the benefits, not only in weight management, but also overall health?

The continual tinkering of out-dated nutrition science is putting the health of the British nation at risk and is contributing to the current National Health Service crisis. The OECD 2017 obesity rankings classified the UK as the sixth most obese nation in the world, a truly dubious honour. Obesity and its related conditions are complex issues which require interventions at multiple levels to achieve both effective prevention and successful treatment, and this is putting an unbearable and unwarranted burden on NHS.

BANT continues to promote its Wellbeing Guidelines campaign to encourage the British people to eat more individual ingredients and unprocessed food.  BANT also continues to call for some grass-roots changes to the approach to the Obesity Crisis: the reintroduction of home economics classes in school; education about healthy eating; how diet and lifestyle can influence health over the short and long-term; and promotion by Government Agencies of the consumption of healthy ingredients and unprocessed food.

The causes of obesity are multifactorial and can include increased stress levels, systemic low-grade inflammation, lack of exercise, and choice of foods and their preparation/cooking methods, amongst others.  There is growing evidence that minimally processed foods like non-starchy vegetables and fruit are more satiating and elicit less of a glycaemic response than ultra-processed foods, so prevalent in typical British diets. Additionally, minimally processed foods are associated with a decreased risk of cardio-metabolic disease.

BANT experts carefully developed a set of Wellbeing Guidelines, based on the latest science and research in the field of nutrition for optimal health. The BANT Wellbeing Guidelines were specifically designed to provide clear, concise, easy to understand information, avoiding out-dated information and research, and addressing some of the most common health concerns.  The most frequent reasons people seek nutritional advice for is to address weight loss and/ or for general health and wellbeing. These issues are addressed by BANT with the following:

BANT Registered Nutrition Practitioners are regulated by the Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) that holds an Accredited Voluntary Register (AVR) for the Professional Standards Authority for Health and Social Care (PSA). A recent report by the Royal Society for Public Health and the Professional Standards Agency made a key recommendation that AR practitioners have the authority to make direct NHS referrals, in appropriate cases, to ease the administrative burden on GP surgeries.

As members of the CNHC Accredited Register, BANT Registered Nutritional Therapy Practitioners and other CNHC registrants, are the key workforce asset to harness 21st century lifestyle medicine to tackle the rising tide of stress related fatigue, obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, dementia and other chronic diseases.

To find a BANT practitioner, please click here: http://bant.org.uk/bant/jsp/practitionerSearch.faces